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Kazu Kibuishi

Comix Talk for January 29, 2010

Whew, made it to Friday.  Sometime next week a new version of ComixTalk at the new server will emerge -- it won't be perfect but mostly what I need this year.  And it should mean the end of me starting posts writing about Drupal and CSS...

I got a fever, and the only prescription... is more AXE COP! You've all read Axe Cop, haven't you?  If I didn't know it was for real I might have thought Kris Straub was behind it...  Coupling really funny and well-done art with scripts from his 5 year old brother Malachai, artist Ethan Nicolle has created something that is a gimmick but I swear I laughed the whole time I was reading it. 

iWEBCOMICS: Paperless Comics has a nice round up of webcomic commenting on the iPad announcement.  I'm not going to think too hard about it until the damn thing is actually in the store, but even though it's not perfect I'm kind of leaning towards getting an iPad right now.  (I wonder if I can write it off as a business expense for this site?)

INTERVIEW: A really nice interview with Kean Soo, creator of the all ages comic Jellaby (and before that his journal comic at keaner.net)

REVIEWS: Tom Spurgeon has a glowing review of Kazu Kibuishi's book, Copper.  Copper has long been one of my favorite comics and I really do want to get a copy of the paper version at some point.  Missed it but earlier this month, Sean Kleefeld reviewed another all ages title -- the prose/comics hybrid book Malice.

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 BLOGS

Seth Godin read Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics and thought it was... about marketing?

Over at Panel & Pixel forums, there's some information and discussion of how intellectual property rights in the U.S. work when a writer and artist collaborate. And another Panel & Pixel post covers creating model sheets for characters for your comic.

Comix Talk for Thursday, January 21, 2010

I think I've officially run out of stupid headlines for daily blog posts... thank you to everyone who gave me advice about webhosts and website software this week.

INTERVIEW: The New Yorker has an interview with comics writer Neil Gaiman. Congrats to Neil on his recent engagement.

REVIEWS:  El Santo reviews Lily of the Valley, a webcomic about a serial killer.  A mixed review - I noticed however, that the artwork reminded me a bit of Faith Erin Hick's work.  There's also a glowing review by The Trades of Kazu Kibuishi's Copper book

THE PROBLEMS WITH DEAD TREES:  Comics Worth Reading writes about Disney's decision to let the first volume of Jellaby go out of print.  The downsides to getting involved with multinational corporations...

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 BLOGS:  Drawn! blog links to Jake Parker, creator of Missile Mouse, writing about fixing inking mistakes old school style (i.e. without Photoshop).  I haven't read it yet but both of my kids have read the new Missile Mouse graphic novel and loved it.

Webcomic Stocking Stuffers

Not a ton happening today so far; hope everyone is having a good week.  If you like the cover art for ComixTalk this month, The Guilded Age crew has got several wallpaper versions of it up for download.  I really love Erica's art on this comic.

DEAD TREES
Kazu Kibuishi reports that his book Copper has been spotted in stores now.

MILESTONES
Something Positive hit 8 years old this week.  Congrats to R.K. Milholland!

JUSTIFY MY HYPE
Wapsi Square looks like they're reaching the battle with the big boss at the end of the game.

Copper by Kazu Kibuishi

The Amulet Book Two, The Stonekeeper's Curse

Kazu Kibuishi once again takes us back into the world of Amulet in Book Two: The Stonekeeper's Curse which is due out from Scholastic in September 2009.  The Stonekeeper's Curse is a compelling story with tons of actions and opens up in much wider ways the world of the first Amulet book.  It's a thrilling tale, a fantastic piece of comics from Kibuishi and a worthy successor to the first book.

Quick news item: webcomic domination of the Harveys

Xaviar Xerexes of ComixTalk reports on an interesting development in the Harvey Awards: a lot more webcomics are getting the nod this year.

There are a lot of webcomic angles to the list of nominees this year, including the seven nominations for Jeff Kinney’s Diary of A Wimpy Kid (a comic with a webcomic origin) and 10 noninations for John Gallagher’s Buzzboy which also has it origins in an online version.

2009 Harvey Awards Nominees

The nominees for the 2009 Harvey Awards are out -- all comics creators (those who write, draw, ink, letter, color, design, edit or are otherwise involved in a creative capacity in the comics field) are eligible to vote for the award winners from now through August 8th.  Ballots for voting are available online here.  There are a lot of webcomic angles to the list of nominees this year, including the seven nominations for Jeff Kinney's Diary of A Wimpy Kid (a comic with a webcomic origin) and 10 noninations for John Gallagher's Buzzboy which also has it origins in an online version.

In the online category, the nominees include three comics on DC's Zuda website: BLACK CHERRY BOMBSHELLS, HIGH MOON, NIGHT OWLS, plus PVP, and LEAST I COULD DO.  Interestingly enough three webcomics from Zuda also received nominations for Best New Series: HIGH MOON, NIGHT OWLS, and SUPERTRON.  (Check out CBR's recent interview with High Moon artist Steve Ellis)

Least I Could Do artist Lar deSouza also snagged nominations for Best Cartoonist and in the Special Award for Humor in Comics.  David Malki! of Wondermark also got a nod in the Special Award for Humor category and another one in the SPECIAL AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN PRESENTATION category for his book WONDERMARK, VOL. 1: BEARDS OF OUR FOREFATHERS (which I own a copy of and agree is absolutely deserving of this recognition).

In the BEST BIOGRAPHICAL, HISTORICAL OR JOURNALISTIC PRESENTATION category HOW TO MAKE WEBCOMICS, by Brad Guigar, Dave Kellett, Scott Kurtz, and Kris Straub received a nomination.  In the Best Anthology category, FLIGHT VOLUME 5, edited by Kazu Kibuishi received a nomination.

Update on Kazu Kibuishi

Good year so far for Kazu Kibuishi - his graphic novel Amulet got nominated for an Eisner award (very good book and tween-teen appropriate); Amulet 2 is apparently past the proofs stage now - not sure of its publication date though; Flight 6, the anthology series he edits is coming this year as well (and features a new Daisy Kutter story from Kibuishi); and best of all: a new Copper comic out this week.

Copper

What Did I Learn?

weekly webcomic reviews by Delos

(this is a repost)

DRAFT List of 100 Greatest Webcomics: Comedy and Drama

Last year I posted a couple times (Previous posts on this "research" project were here and here) about a possible article on "ComixTALK's 100 Greatest Webcomics" which would be something like the American Film Institute's list of the greatest movies of the last 100 years.

A recurring comment to the previous two posts was what is the criteria for this.  I'm always a little hesitant to give too much guidance when part of the point of asking this kind of thing out loud is to listen to the resulting discussion of what everyone else thinks the criteria should be.  For the AFI list judges picked films based on criteria such as Critical Recognition, Major Award Winner, Popularity Over Time, Historical Significance, and Cultural Impact.

That sounds about right to me.  We've got a round decade plus a year or two of webcomics to look at it.  Critical reception (both from peers and critics), and popularity are both relevant to thinking about the impact of a webcomic.  WCCA awards are somewhat indicative of what peers were impressed with in a given year and more recently awards like the Eisners and Ignatzs have recoginized webcomics.  Historical significance and cultural impact are a little harder to pin down but various "firsts" in webcomics are important and comics like Penny Arcade have had a much wider impact on popular culture than most comics do these days (put aside the legacy superheros of comics -- what other "new" comic, let alone webcomic, in the last decade has had a wide cultural impact?)

Another thing AFI did that might be useful here to help sort through the vast numbers of webcomics one could talk about is to also think about categories or genres of work.  Just as a simple matter of numbers if a webcomic isn't one of the best of a larger type of story -- or frankly, so startlingly unique it's hard to categorize -- then it's hard to imagine it's one of the 100 Greatest...

So to move things along I'm listing another "draft" of titles submitted by the crowds but this time I've tried to break them up into drama and comedy so as to help avoid complete apples to oranges comparisons.  In doing that I've realized (1) it's hard in many cases to decide; and (2) there are probably more comedic than drama on the list so far.  I think it would make sense to whittle down the two lists to 75 each so as the final list is no more than 3/4 of one type or the other.  Of course we could further do genre type lists but for now this was enough work on my part.

So -- your assignment (if you choose to play):

  1. Name the comic you're talking about (you're also welcome to nominate ones not on the list -- I KNOW there are many I haven't even thought about yet -- it takes time to review all of the corners of the web)
  2. Tell me where on one the two lists (comedy and drama) it should be (you could give a range of slots if you're not sure). (If you think I've got a drama on the comedy list or vice-versa let me know!  I'm not "done" - this is fairly dashed off still at this point)
  3. Tell me why!  Referencing awards, critics, historical achievements, strengths and weaknesses of the works are all really helpful!