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Raina Telgemeier

Comix Talk for Wednesday, August 4, 2010

I suspect posting will be relatively light this month unless I get my act together this week and recruit some more interesting guest bloggers (I'm still open to unsolicited offers to guest blog!).  I started a little work on a story I thought might be interesting if I uncovered anything -- basically I tried to contact the first 100 members of ComixTalk thinking I might discover a mix of stories from people who've stayed pretty visible in comics to those whose stories maybe have never been well-covered.  I've gotten a few responses but it's too much work in tracking down folks to take that approach for any larger number of member accounts. (If you have an old account at ComixTalk you're having trouble accessing please let me know -- I'd be happy to try to help you out)  So my new pitch is -- if you joined ComixTalk (Comixpedia in those days) in 2003 and you're interested in giving me a snapshot of now and then for you in comics (I have some questions I've been emailing to folks; but that's what I'm after) please email, comment here or tweet me. 

MILESTONES

HYPE

INTERVIEWS

CONVENTIONS: SPX announces that Dean Haspiel and Kate Beaton will be guests this year.  Between SPX and Intervention that is going to be an epic comics weekend in the DC area. 

MAILBAG: I got an email from creator Lee Leslie about the webcomic RiGBY, an Epic Webcomic about the Tales of an Amateur Barbarian.  RiGBY follows the adventures of the titular hero as she navigates a world of reanimated skeletons, warriors on dinosaurs and savage snake-men.  Leslie describes the webcomic as combining "the fun world-building of high fantasy stories like Lord of the Rings or Conan the Barbarian with a fun and relatable protagonist.  Basically, she’s the love child of Indiana Jones and Red Sonja.”

Comix Talk Talk

Tales of a Checkered Man by Denver Brubaker

Well it's a three day weekend here in the 'States so we'll pick things up again on Tuesday of next week (anything on the weekend is pure bonus, baby). Also picking things up next week is Dirk Tiede’s Paradigm Shift which returns from hiatus on Tuesday (h/t FLEEN).

INTERVIEW:  Playback has a nice interview with Raina Telgemeier about Smile and the X-Men: Misfits comic.

DEAD TREES: Robot6 reports that Jason Little's second Bee comic, Motel Art Improvement Service will be published by Darkhorse this fall.

MAILBAG: Denver Brubaker writes in about his webcomic Tales of a Checkered Man, a comedy take on a Batman-like crimefighter.  Brubaker writes "Fans of superhero satire and parody as well as classic adventure pulps and traditional newspaper strips will enjoy this all-new comic strip adventure; think Charlie Brown as a masked-vigilante."

Comix Talk for April 12, 2010

Outbound #2

CONVENTION: By all accounts MoCCA saw the debut of a ton of great books - The Beat has a good round-up here. The cover of Outbound #2 looked great too - I've enjoyed the previous anthologies from the Boston Comics Roundtable and look forward to checking out this one too.

MAILBAG: I got a review copy of Dracula Is a Racist, a new prose book from Cyanide & Happiness author Matt Melvin with art from Melvin and DJ Coffman.  If you enjoy the humor of C&H you'll like this book.  There seem to have been a spate of "how-to" tougue-in-cheek books recently (like the Zombie Survival Guide) - this one may be even a bit more tongier-in-cheekier.  For some reason a running gag is comparing how much cooler vampires are than zombies.  You get the impression reading this book that Melvin has a pretty dark sense of humor but probably is a nice guy in person (I interviewed him back in 2007) - his sense of humor is more goofy than cutting.

MILESTONES: Happy Birthday Onezumi!

AROUND THE BLOGS:

Comix Talk for Thursday, April 8, 2010

Split Lip Volume 2 by Sam CostelloFleen reported yesterday that Phil Foglio caught that Merriam Webster had "webcomic" up as a new word for April 2010.  I've always liked webcomic because (1) it's self-explanatory and (2) no one calls comedians doing something online "webcomics".

CONVENTIONS: MoCCA is this weekend.  Sam Costello the creator of the horror webcomic Split Lip will be debuting a special limited edition of its Volume 2 trade paperback with a new, previously unpublished story and a new cover by Shane Oakley.  The 10 stories in the collection offer 160 pages of disturbing, intellectual horror stories with art by Sami Makkonen (Hatter M vol. 2), Anthony Perruzo (Zuda), John Bivens (Comic book Tattoo), and Jason Ho (Agnes Quill). 

And Brigid Alverson has a round-up of lots more great books that will be available at MoCCA.

INTERVIEWS: The Beat has an interview with Hope Larson and Raina Telgemeier.  Together they're hosting the "Drink & Draw Like A Lady" event.

AWARDS: You can make nominations for the Eagle awards now.  Go Intertubes go...

FROM THE MAILBAG

So The Boy with Nails for Eyes by Shaun Gardiner is pretty interesting.  It's a webcomic with music, and a kind of delayed, cinematic presentation of the panels on a "page" that pushes -- but in my mind mostly doesn't break -- the boundary of comicness.  Really in terms of experimenting with the notion of a comic embedded in the web, this is fantastic stuff.  And the interface used to navigate within the "page" and to go from page to page is pretty easy.  So far there is only one chapter up of what is supposed to be a much longer story.  The art is fantastic, the brief text so far interesting, hard to guess if the work as a whole will be satisfying but certainly Gardiner's setting a high bar for himself.  I heartily recommend checking this out.

Nate Wunderman wrote to mention his webcomics E.I. and Time Corps.  Talk about extremes - I went from being immersed in the webbiness of The Boy with Nails for Eyes to Wunderman's comics which are all presented in pdf format.  I can't repeat this enough -- use an image format that's native to browsers.  You want to offer a .pdf as an alternate version, great, but start with something from the holy trinity of image formats; gif, jpg and png.

Comix Talk for Thursday, March 4, 2010

Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins

INTERVIEWS: Time's Techland Blog is the next step on the Penny Arcade book tourSean Collins interviews Nick Gurewitch about some short comics he did for Marvel.  Marvel?  Yeah Marvel!  He has Hulk and Wolverine comics in an upcoming  book.  CrunchGear interviews Drew and Natalie Dee of Toothpaste for Dinner fame.  And David Harper interviews Brock Heasley, co-creator of Monsterplex, the most recent winner of the Zuda contest.  Heasley's other webcomic is the superheroes in a retirement home comedy -- Super Fogeys.  (h/t to Paperless Comics which does a far most exhaustive job than I of tracking down webcomic-related interviews and reviews around the web)

REVIEW: Christopher Irving at GraphicNYC gives Raina Telgemeier's Smile a great review.

LEGAL BEAGLE: Long article at CBR on the Incarnate/Bleach copying scandal and the line on plagerism and homage/inspiration in general.  If you're interested in the subject, worth a read.

JUSTIFY MY HYPE Channeling Randy Jackson for a minute: Dude, Rosenburg you just killed it tonight! That thing is hawt!  Seriously - this animated panel of Goats is great fun and doing it as an animated gif is practically like employing medieval age technology by the standards of Internet time.

AROUND DEM BLOGS: Hope Larson reminds you that she is not Bryan Lee O'Malley's secretaryAlexis Farjado announced that his new Kid Beowulf book The Song of Rowland is off to the printers.

Comix Talk for Friday, February 26, 2010

Art by Vera Brosgol

What a week it was... or was it?!  El Santo posts up a question about "what age of comics" are we in?  I think both in terms of the evolution of digital platforms and explosion of variety of subject matter this decade represented the beginning of a new era.  What to call it though?  Digital is only half the story.

SWIPER NO SWIPING! Two incidents of bad behavior this week - one already rectified.  FLEEN has a writeup of Hot Topic's selling of ripped-off artwork from Vera Brosgol.  I saw bits of the twitter stream on this yesterday and while Hot Topic seriously needs to revamp it's IP review in its process of acquiring product, the "producer" of this shirt was some band. (The Beat has a picture comparing t-shirt to artwork)  Artists ripping off other artists? Not cool guys.  The other big to-do this week was Nick Simmon copying artwork repeatedly from the manga seriesTite Kubo Bleach.  Simmon's publisher Radical has pulled his book for now.

MONEY MONEY MONEY:  Rare comic books sell for one million dollars.  Okay, whatever?  I don't care one way or the other about rare comic book sales -- I like to read comics, not collect physical artifacts.

INTERVIEW: CBR interviews Phil Foglio about his current webcomic Girl GeniusThe Foglios are having a donation drive for their colorist Cheyenne Wright who was quite ill (but good news! is recovering).

CONTEST: Raina Telgemeier is having a contest where you can win a copy of her new graphic novel Smile.  Deadline is this Sunday!

ComixTalk for Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Greystone Inn by Brad GuigarWe had the Son of Snowpocalypse in Washington DC yesterday.  Not all that exciting actually.  Also finally saw AVATAR in 3D on Sunday night. (Ain't Mrs X cool to take me to that for Valentines Day?!)  Reviews were dead-on; awesome world-building and special effects to carry it off, story was Dances With Wolves With Four Eyes and Gil Slits.  All in all, a great movie experience.

AWARDS: Tom Spurgeon has a list of the nominees for this year's Glyph awards.

MILESTONES: Congrats to Brad Guigar on 10 years of comicking!  Brad has had a heck of a decade pioneering this thing we call webcomics and I hope there's lots more to come.  In his blog post there's a BIG hint that a full collection of his first strip, Greystone Inn, will be coming to print.

Also docking in close to 10 years is the Flight anthology series.  Kazu Kibuishi announces that Flight 8 will be the last edition of that very successful project.

INTERVIEWS: Growly Beast has an interview with Tom Dell'Aringa of Marooned and The Internet Review of Science Fiction has a fairly indepth interview with Howard Tayler of Schlock Mercenary.  UPDATE: Graphic NYC has an interview with Raina Telgemeier, who's most recent work is the graphic novel Smile.

JUSTIFY VARIOUS PEOPLE'S HYPE:

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 BLOGS:  Kids book author/illustrator Mo Willems takes a crack at Hilary Price's Rhymes With Oranges this week.  Also details on Hilary's trip to Cuba with Jeannie Schulz and other cartoonists including Alexis Fajardo.  Haven't talked with Alexis in years - maybe I better catch up with him! :)  (h/t Daily Cartoonist)

SECRET SCIENCE ALLIANCE ACTIVATE!  The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook by Eleanor Davis won this year's CYBIL award for the graphic novel category. The CYBILs are the Children's and Young Adult Bloggers' Literary Awards.  And TCJ posted a four part interview with Eleanor, husband Drew Weing and the rest of the creative crew from the Secret Science Alliance book.  Here's part one (with links to part 1 & 2 and part 3 & 4):

Comix Talk for Friday, February 12, 2010

Zombies Calling by Faith Erin HicksWe're finally digging out of the snow here in Washington DC -- apparently the volume of frosted flakes falling felled a record.  Anyhow - wanted to let everyone know that new user registrations are back online at Comix Talk.  You don't need to register with Comix Talk to comment on anything BUT registering gives you the ability to have a user blog and post to Comix Talk news and hype if you so desire.  New registrations are not automatically approved, however, so it may take up to a day for me to check them.

All Ages: El Santo had an interesting overview of what makes comics good for kids.  A good source for what's new with all ages comics is the Good Comics for Kids blog.  I've certainly had more interest in these comics again as my kids have gotten into comics.

No Good Deed Goes Unpublished: Coyote Trax has an article about webcomic creators involvement in charity and other good deeds.  El Santo had a recent post about the comic Snowflakes participation in Heart Health Month.

INTERVIEWS

Comix Talk for Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Gemma Correll

OMFGUIHAJB!!!! It is snowing again in Washington DC. IT IS SNOWING... AGAIN.  I have a review of Smile up today.  In addition, be sure to check out the bonus comic Raina Telgemeier did.  I saw this funny comic about one of the downsides of the Internet today (see above) - Gemma Correll has lots more great illustrations on her Flickr page.

Congratulations: 1Up names Jerry Holkins and Mike Krahulik to their five most influential people in videogames for the last decade.

Weird, but something I suspect many readers here might be interested in checking out -- MyWebWill purports to be a service for managing your digital identity after death.  Think about it -- you're going to create a ton of stuff online in your life, some of it at least as important as any physical stuff you'll leave behind.

JUSTIFY MY HYPE: Jamie Noguchi has a new webcomic called Yellow Peril.  Jamie was the original artist for Erfworld, is a heck of an artist and part of the Super Art Fight crew.  Jamie also runs Monster Cutie which is a great source of tips and craft for illustrators.

Last, not comics but this Oscar nominated short, Logorama, is all kinds of weird-cool.  Language is very NSFW btw.

Smile by Raina Telgemeier

Smile by Raina Telgemeier

Raina Telgemeier has worked on Smile for a long time.  First posting parts of it online, she eventually inked a deal to publish it as a book with the Scholastic, the publisher of the Babysitters Club graphic novels Raina worked on.  As she explains in this interview, she had about half of it done online when the book deal came about:

I’d posted about 120 pages of Smile online, on a page-a-week basis, before Scholastic picked up the publishing rights. The pages were drawn over a four-year period and were written as I went along. So there were things I wanted to fix, a few continuities that needed to be straightened out…and I was suddenly working with editors! What I did was sit down and write out the entire rest of the book, and then we figured out what, if anything, from the first half needed revising.

The finished book is really good.  It should fit right in with other favorite young adult novels of the middle school set.