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What good are collectives?

I know they're great for cross-promotion, but is there any other benefit to being a member of one?

These places are great for

MrColinP's picture

These places are great for getting people to read your comic! You can also meet people and get feedback from actual peers... what more could you want?

 

I think it's really interesting actually, in that many more people make comic books then say, fifteen years ago. I bet the number has grown exponentially, because most people would not dedicate themselves to making a comic without an audience, and had no idea how to reach people. And what is the internet if not an instant audience?

That would be interesting. A

That would be interesting. A sort of link exchnage thingie between similar comics (genre, style, etc) as opposed to a bunch of comics all sitting on one special website. The whole idea of uprooting yourself and joining yet another collective isn't very appealing. Dee G.A.A.K: Groovy Ass Alien Kreatures It's like The Goonies meets The Invaders from Mars. Updates on Mondays.

G.A.A.K: Groovy Ass Alien Kreatures It's like The Goonies meets The Invaders from Mars. Updates on Mondays.

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Shishio's picture

Yeah, I remember. But as you must have surmised by now, I scrapped it, as interest was dismal, and most people didn't even understand what I was doing.


One-liners - New strips on Fridays.

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Shishio's picture

Actually, I was already a reader of Lucid TV, and I invited them to join the collective I'm forming with some other creators.


One-liners - New strips on Fridays.

The web is a small world

larsony's picture

The web is a small world innit? I'm interested to see the collective you develop, since you might remember I was one of the folk interested in that web comic link exchange thing you were doing.

<a xhref=http://www.north-world.com> Read North World </a> Modern Fantasy comic.

It's a Good Social Experience

Sean C's picture

Really, it is. I've made some solid friends through my collective, and the cross-promotion is almost like a happy bonus.

It can also get you to branch out. I've done guest strips for several other members of Bomb Shelter, and am currently working on some Christmas-theme ones, and messing with style and approach is a blast - it's something I wouldn't want to do on my own strip, but when you try to get the general style of someone else's work, it can be brutal/fun.

You can always make connections through your collective members, too. Socialization can be made easier through a collective.

Don't hesitate to procrastinate.

Don't hesitate to procrastinate. My brand new comic: http://cain.bombsheltercomics.com

That's a really good

larsony's picture

That's a really good question.

From my experience there are folks like Eyeskream who pride themselves on having a community with likeminded comic artists helping each other, do guest comics, and develop a community.

They asked me to join but I opted out when it was explained that they are not a link exchange but a full community. So I started Empty Panels for myself and the folk who do Lucid TV (check it). I'm developing my own type of community and getting to know them better. We also do a podcast and I believe some of us are going to get a shared table at upcoming conventions.

In short: It can do quite a bit.

<a xhref=http://www.north-world.com> Read North World </a> Modern Fantasy comic.

street cred -------

oolong's picture

street cred

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It largely depends on the

macnut's picture

It largely depends on the collective, but many of them offer free hosting, and some, like Keenspot, offer a cut of ad revenues.

But the cross-promotional opportunities are usually the main reason for going to a collective, especially if said collective is made up of already-popular webcomics.

 

The MacNut
Creator/Writer/Artist
The Vanguard
http://thevanguardhome.com

The MacNut
Creator/Writer/Artist
The Vanguard
http://thevanguardhome.com