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Monthly Themes for 2007?

Many Comixpedia monthly issues have themes where the magazine articles focus on a particular subject. Tell us your ideas for what to cover next year. Some past themes we could return to include: journal comics; webcomics in print; women in webcomics; and webcomics theory.

Pencil

mooncity's picture

I like the various art methods being used in webcomics right now, as I mentioned previously. There are some out there which eschew the full-on digital tools, other than the obvious requirements of posting the comics to the 'net. One of the interesting phenomenon is webcomics made primarily in pencil (something mentioned on another site I visit). My favorite of these is "By The Saints", but that's down due to server trouble right now. There are others that use pencil or even colored markers as a base ("Lords of Death and Life"), and then spiff it up with digital tools.

Along the lines of "Villains", though, how about looking at Heroes in a new light. That is, not how great they are, because everyone thinks it'd be great to be a hero, but rather maybe an article on the down side of being a hero would be fun (the Peter Parker Syndrome). Ever wonder, where do heroes get their costumes cleaned? Where do they get replacement ones, etc., etc...?

Mooncity

Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow since 1976!

Mooncity

Autumn Lake

Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow since 1976!

Niche comics

Would be interesting to see an article on how even the most niche and specialized comics can cultivate a following via the web.

http://www.whattheduck.net/
The comic strip for and about photographers.

I was going to suggest

I was going to suggest something similar. Several of the most commercially successful comics target specific niches--videogames mainly. But I've seen comics for librarians (Unshelved), toy collectors (Shortpacked), and the like. I'm sure there are many more than I'm unaware of, being outside the niches they're targeted to.

PictureStoryTheater.com:Fables & Fairy Tales

TwentySevenLetters.com: Experiments

There are a lot of good,

There are a lot of good, practical themes suggested here already. That's usually what I like to see, but for today, I'm going to go the other direction and suggest some pure fun themes.

First off, how about a "Villains" issue? That's actually broader than it might sound. First off, you've got the "how to write a good villain" article. You can examine how different comics handle villainy, which play with pure evil and which employ sympathetic villains. Also, there's an interesting phenomenon in webcomics of presenting stories from the villains' point of view: Narbonic, Chopping Block, and Sluggy Freelance come immediately to mind, but there are many more. This phenomenon might be worth exploring--at the very least, these sorts of comics would be obvious choices for review.

PictureStoryTheater.com:Fables & Fairy Tales

TwentySevenLetters.com: Experiments

Great idea!

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

Great idea - themes are hooks for me for organizing a month and pitching articles to potential contributors. Fun ideas work as well, or better, than more practical-minded ones.

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Xaviar Xerexes

Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Gnaw.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Not a Bad Idea on the "How to Avoid Bad Manga" Bit

Sean C's picture

It's too bad the vast majority of bad-manga-makers would never listen. They've got their own little comics culture, where critisism is rejected by under a wave of Livejournal whining. If they THINK they're making something decent, chances are they're not gonna make adjustments. Sigh - such is the modern mangaphile...

Don't hesitate to procrastinate.

Don't hesitate to procrastinate. My brand new comic: http://cain.bombsheltercomics.com

Heh, heh! Sad but true! I'm

mooncity's picture

Heh, heh! Sad but true! I'm certainly no Bill Watterson when it comes to drawing my comic, but it seems to me that for every really good manga webcomic, there's dozens out there that look... well... like it was drawn (and written) by a kid in junior high school during his or her study hall. Most webcomickers are hobbyists, as mentioned elsewhere, but there's a big difference between knowing how to put on a band-aid properly, and doing open-heart surgery. Both take practice. One takes a dedicated commitment to learning how to do it right.

Mark

Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow since 1976!

Mooncity

Autumn Lake

Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow since 1976!

Manga

mooncity's picture

The explosion of manga in the webcomic world might be interesting to look at. The appeal of the style for webcomic artists, etc., and how aspiring webcomic artists can make something new out of it, when so many webcomics are mangas already, how to avoid the pitfalls of bad manga webcomics, things like that.

Mooncity

Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow since 1976!

Mooncity

Autumn Lake

Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow since 1976!

I'd be really interested in

Petie Shumate's picture

I'd be really interested in a look at science/science fiction in webcomics. Granted, you'd see a lot more of the latter, but good science in webcomics always makes me very, very happy.

 

girl/robot - One girl. One robot. A series of unintentionally scarring escapades.

girl/robot - One girl. One robot. A series of unintentionally scarring escapades.

The Culcha

CaveMonster's picture

How about the culture around webcomics? All the webcomic review sites and podcasts, all the blogs, the Websnarks and the Comicspaces all the peripheral stuff that has grown up around the experience of going to a site and looking at comics.

The stars are pretty tonight. Let's [url=http://www.iamarocketbuilder.com]go there.[/url

The stars are pretty tonight. Let's [url=http://www.iamarocketbuilder.com]go there.[/url

History

almamater's picture

It might be interesting to cover history as seen through the eyes of webcomics. Along the same lines, I'd also like to see a feature covering webcomics and "high culture" (such as literature or art history).

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How about webcomics from the

Bryant Paul Johnson's picture
How about webcomics from the under 20 crowd? (Or even the under 18 crowd.)
I keep seeing comics from younger and younger creators;something that I don't recall from my days as a pup.
Other ideas: non-english webcomics; creative commons and webcomics; spirituality/faith in webcomics

- teaching baby paranoia

Webcomics for Younger Readers

Keith Quinn's picture

At first glance, I misread the start of your post as "How about webcomics for the under 20 crowd? (Or even the under 18 crowd.)" That made me think another good idea could be "webcomics for younger readers."

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Local Heroes at www.localheroes.us
Follow the periodic misadventures of the super-powered heroes of UNIONS Local 37.

Local Heroes (http://www.localheroes.us): Super-powered all-ages fun | Playtime Projects (http://www.playtimeprojects.com): A dysfunctional children's show (strong language)

Long-form or "graphic

mooncity's picture

Long-form or "graphic novel" type webcomics may be interesting to cover. I'd also like to see something on different art styles being used for them, and for webcomickry in general. For example, several artists use watercolors for their graphic comics, but there isn't much being said about it.

There's also the old debate over "standard" style comics vs. "infinite canvas" style comics. I haven't heard much about that in a while, so it might be an interesting topic to revisit and see who (if anybody), won that argument.

And perhaps something on the content of webcomics today. Is there any particular trend towards G-rated or R-rated language/content, etc. now, vs. a few years ago?

 

Mooncity

Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow since 1976!

Mooncity

Autumn Lake

Reversing the polarity of the neutron flow since 1976!

How about a Marketing and

Keith Quinn's picture

How about a Marketing and Merchandise theme? I imagine such a theme including all the various ways that webcomic creators try to offer alternative ways to spread the word about their comics, with such things as desktop wallpapers, AIM icons, buttons, clothes, toys, iPod covers, and web cartoons. Not just what people make, but what "works" and why it works.

=========
Local Heroes at www.localheroes.us
Follow the periodic misadventures of the super-powered heroes of UNIONS Local 37.

Local Heroes (http://www.localheroes.us): Super-powered all-ages fun | Playtime Projects (http://www.playtimeprojects.com): A dysfunctional children's show (strong language)

The thing with what works

moovok's picture

The thing with what works and what doesn't is quite hard to do. There's many factors that effect it, usually (1) is it unique and interesting enough for someone to buy and (2) is the comic popular.

Sure the comic doesn't have to be popular for it to sell, if they've got the perfect merchandise that can sell to anyone who either has or hasn't read the comic, then great, that usually does sell nicely. But there's definately a lot of factors :)

That's more of an article idea

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

That's a good idea for an article(s), but probably too narrow a concept to be a useful theme.

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Xaviar Xerexes

Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Gnaw.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Collectives!

Sean C's picture

How 'bout some coverage on webcomic collectives? This year was a big year for collectives, as quite a few good ones formed. Since this is really starting to take off, why not talk about some of them, who they are, and what they do to set themselves apart from all the other collectives?

Don't hesitate to procrastinate.

Don't hesitate to procrastinate. My brand new comic: http://cain.bombsheltercomics.com

Suggestion Box

pclips's picture

Webcomics Outside the Web - a look at RSS, mobile device, email, print periodical, and other distribution media which webcomics have explored or crossed into. Plus a look at video podcasting, internet radio, music, animation and other new media content related to webcomics.

I'd like to see an

Joey Manley's picture

I'd like to see an examination of the efforts of Marvel, DC, Dark Horse and Image to figure out webcomics -- what they've done in the past, what they're doing now, and what they say they want to do.

Article earlier in 2006 on DC, Marvel, etc.

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

We did take a stab at this subject back in April. A lot has happened this year though...

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Xaviar Xerexes

Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Gnaw.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

This would be the comedy

The William G's picture

This would be the comedy issue, then?


I think that would make an

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

I think that would make an interesting article (or series of articles).

To turn that into a broader theme though it might sound something like - "'Pre-Webcomics' in a Webcomics Age" - that gives me a hook for thinking of interviews, reviews, etc. to go along with the feature idea.

 

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Xaviar Xerexes

Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Gnaw.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.