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Webcomics Promotion - Now and Then (Part 2 of 2)

Social Networking

Eight years ago, social networking online was limited to message boards, chat rooms and instant messaging programs. None of these were ever a great way to get new people excited about our webcomics. Now we have more social networking doodads than we know what to do with.

If you have the technical know-how, add buttons for del.icio.us and digg and the like. Your readers will know what to do, and when they love a particular comic, they’ll share it with the rest of the Internet.

ComicSpace, MySpace and Facebook can be valuable tools to promote your work as well. ComicSpace is a great way to promote your work to other comic artists, whereas MySpace and Facebook can be really effective ways to send people to your webcomic who might not have found it otherwise. Think about the times you’ve been messaged on MySpace to check out a new band. This approach may or may not work for your comic, but if you have the time and patience to seek people who have listed things in their interest that lead you to believe that they’ll enjoy your strip, you have little to lose! Make your profile as interesting and informative as possible with plenty of links to your comic. If you’re willing to put the time in, you’ll see results. Both Facebook and Myspace offer groups as well, which can give your comic’s readers a place to meet eachother and talk about your strip.

Comic Networks

After a year or so into the game, I was invited to join Keenspot. This was highly significant at the time as it was the first and at the time, only webcomic network. These days there are several networks, each with completely different purposes, promotion styles and attitudes.

Naturally any joining up you can do with other webcomics is a great move, promotion-wise. Joining an existing network is obviously a great move. Or, consider creating a new network with a few friends whose comics you think would appeal to the same crowd. Strength is in numbers, after all. Together, you can split a booth at comic conventions, send traffic to eachother’s comics and split advertising costs.

Advertising

There’s just no comparison. Plain and simple, advertising today is infinitely easier than it was years ago. Project Wonderful is just that – wonderful. If you can set aside a budget for advertising, I highly recommend it. If you advertise for a specific product – for instance a T-shirt you’ve produced – you can expect your advertising money to be more effective. Or, try directing your link to a welcome page, giving your readers a taste of your comic and a quick recap of the plot. It might suck them in more than just seeing the latest strip. Think movie trailer!

 

And don’t forget – the cheapest advertising might not be the best deal. Advertising on more expensive sites can pay off – especially if you share a similar readership.

 

Good luck in promoting your comic! If you have time and money and are willing to put for the effort, you will undoubtedly see your traffic grow. Never forget that effective promotion takes time and repetition.

Re: Webcomics Promotion - Now and Then (Part 2 of 2)

themysticalone's picture

On the whole, this would have been slightly more effective if it let us know more or less how to add links to del.icio.us and digg, not that it's tremendously hard to find out, but people are lazy and free, quick information is golden.

Matt Buchwald: Fodi

Matt Buchwald: Fodi

Re: Webcomics Promotion - Now and Then (Part 2 of 2)

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

Well that's not so easy actually - manually all you do is go over to those sites, fill out the forms and submit your links.

Automating that or setting up buttons on your own site to enocurage it depends on the software you're using on your own site. Most blogging/CMS software these days has a plug-in for various DIGG-like sharing site.

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Xaviar Xerexes

Oh yeah... this place is called ComixTalk now.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Re: Webcomics Promotion - Now and Then (Part 2 of 2)

Chris Cantrell's picture

Everytime I see one of these articles I hope that it will approach this subject in a new way but it never seems to. Maybe these are the only ways to market a webcomic but it just seems like beating a dead horse at this point.

Haunted Pixel Studios
www.hauntedpixelstudios.com

Haunted Pixel Studios www.hauntedpixelstudios.com

Re: Webcomics Promotion - Now and Then (Part 2 of 2)

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

Well hopefully everyone is trying to think of newer/better ways to get word-of-mouth around but I think Corey's post is a nice snapshot of how some tactics have gotten much better and much easier (not to mention much cheaper with PW) than when she (and I for that matter) started posting comics on the intertubes.

Comicspace, Project Wonderful - heck stable vote lists like buzzcomix and webcomic reading/update sites like thewebcomiclist and piperka.ne are all tremendous improvements over... well like not having those sites/services.

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Xaviar Xerexes

Oh yeah... this place is called ComixTalk now.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.