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What Did I Learn?: Lullaby

Lullaby is created and art done by Hector Sevilla, written by Mike S. Miller and Ben Avery, colors by Simon Bork, David Curiel and Ulises Arreloa, lettered by Bill Tortolini. It is this delicious mix of fairy tales and literary sources with an edge. The characters are familiar yet have some twists to them, as you can see from the picture. Alice, Jim Hawkins and Pinnochio are not what you’d expect, are they? The art is perfectly suited to the subject matter, too.

lullaby 195x300 LullabyI don’t want to give the first storyline away – Alice describes how she came to be in this place and what has happpened to her. I haven’t yet read on to see what happens in the rest of the series yet. I wanted to see how my thoughts changed from these first impressions compared to the whole work.

Using the basis of fairy tales, your expectations are trained by sheer repetition of all those images in children’s books. Alice should be this look like a little blond girl and be very meek in stance. Don’t mess with this Alice. She’s got a little attitude. All the other characters, while familiar, are very different from your trained expectation.

Lullaby is the kind of story we wish we had written. In addition to the creative visual twist, there are little storytelling techniques used that play to the themes of living in a fantasy, fairy tale world. If you’ve ever read the original Grimm’s Fairy Tales, you already realize that those tales had consequences. Rapunzel was not rescued, for instance. There’s a certain logic to them that the characters had to adhere to. You can’t ignore the witch’s prattling – that’s what we would do in that situation. Lullaby, in this first comic, respects that sort of tradition.

What did I learn?

There’s always a new take on old stories while still staying true to them. You can download your own pdf copies of Lullaby from here or you can see Lullaby online right here. (Wowio went through a reboot and I can’t find Lullaby on there at this time.)