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Robot 13 Colossus! review

What Did I Learn?

R13 Cover 2 samp 200x311 Robot 13 Colossus! reviewRobot 13’s Colossus! Issue 2 had me appreciating the big picture. Specifically, the big mythological picture that Robot 13 finds himself in. As is evident from the cover image, Robot 13 is confronting the capricious Pheonix.

At first, I was a little confused where the Pheonix came from. The blame for this can be laid squarely at me feet, though. I read through it a couple of times and finally paid more attention to the visuals – and there it was, clear as day. So clear that I have to question why I missed it in the first place. That’s me, folks, overlooking the obvious so you don’t have to. I think it has something to do with the art not having a lot of extra visual detail so I hung. on. every. word. Don’t make the same mistake I made.

It was at this point that I realized that I’ve been over analyzing. It’s a big story with great visuals and deeply appealing themes. Note that elegant technique for drawing fire on the cover… it’s symbolic but you never question it as ‘real’ fire – flames do not come in four layers of color, after all. As I write this, it’s a rainy, introspective day and that’s obviously coloring my impressions. It’s also a little difficult to speak about some specific things without spoiling things for you.

Suffice it to say there is a good amount of action, great story and captivating art. I also learned about a mythical figure I heretofore had not known. After doing a little research, that personage is bad mojo – pretty much as bad as bad gets in mythology. And laying the grounds for an even bigger bad mojo, too. I’m really enjoying where this comic is taking us and I am curious where the cliffhangar ending will take our hero in the next book.

Robot 13 is very subtle in many ways and the tricky thing is that the hints are openly dropped. However, even for someone with a sizable interest in mythology, the hints serve more as a tantalizing taste of what’s to come than telegraphing too much of the story.

What Did I Learn?

Myth based stories carry some familiar-ness with them that need to be reckoned with. You can either be completely faithful to the letter (of some version) of a myth, cater primarily to the myth’s flavor or adapt the myth to suit your vision. Or, I suppose, you can treat certain elements differently but you need a strong theme to tie all the takes together which is what Robot 13 has managed to accomplish. You can order a copy through the Robot 13 website.

ArtPatient