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Comix Talk for Thursday, November 18, 2010

Thursday! Days of thurs!? What is a "thur" anyhow...

COPYFIGHT: Journalista posted links to a number of copyright-related articles this morning of interest. Colleen Doran writes about her bad experiences with pirates and her good experiences with have a webcomic the last year. Sean Kleefeld writes about a Chrome Browser extension that makes reading manga scanlations easier - his point that many of these are unauthorized derivative works is what drags it into copyrightland.

INTERVIEWS: GraphicNYC has an interview with Art Spiegelman.

iWEBCOMIC: Rich Barrett writes to announce that his webcomic Nathan Sorry has officially made the move into the digital comics space. Issue number 1 is now available through Graphic.ly for 99¢ and can be read on the iPhone, iPad, Windows 7 and soon Android – not to mention Graphic.ly’s Adobe Air powered Desktop application.

MILESTONES: Gavin Hignight and Jettila Lewis hit the one year mark with their webcomic The Concrete World They also announced that they are giving away 50 free copies of their graphic novel MOTOR CITY to the first 50 new subscribers to join their email list starting at 9:00 AM (PST) on November 19th 2010. 

MAILBAG

Juan Mejias writes in about his webcomic The Pigeons' Rule about an office clerk unremarkable for everything other than his unrelenting nervousness and his rooftop neighbors, which range from a Roc bird to an antropomorphic cat-fishing mouse.  Nice website, the webcomic is definitely getting better -- it's a first sustained effort, much like a first novel. I'm not sure I'm sold on this comic, but I do think Mejias shows potential.

Mark Maultby writes in about his brand new webcomic MoonPuppy. Well so far it feels like the opening to a Swedish auteur film from the 70's.  Not sure if that's what Maultby's going for or not.  In any event please grab Comicpress or an equivalent for Wordpress - don't make readers work hard simply to peruse your archives.

Nate Wunderman writes in that he's changed from downloadable pdfs to pop-up jpgs for viewing his online comic E.I. - I don't know if Nate really wants advice or not but this is the kind of half-step that really isn't worth the trouble.  His website isn't necessarily bad, but it isn't efficient in its function. It should either have the latest update to the comic on the home page or it should be really easy to click once to get there.  I think there's lots to debate about online publishing but I do think that advice is pretty much a truism at this point. PDFs are useful to download things - a plausible approach to packing an issue of something.  Not a good approach for something in the middle of being serialized.  I don't see much benefit to going with a pop-up image approach over just embedding the image into the website like Comicpress/Wordpress does so well.  Pop-ups just require extra clicking.