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Comix Talk for Monday, March 14, 2011

Hope you had a good weekend.  Be sure to check out Dave Kellett's talk on comics from fall of last year (see the post below this one).  I'd also recommend chekcing out an interesting post Derik Badman has up at the Panelists on what makes a great comic (hint: a great story).

CRAFT: Frank Santoro has a post on layouts at the new TCJ.

HYPE: Check out this Hero initiative JLA cover art by Dean Haspiel. That looks great! Has Haspiel ever drawn the big three of DC or any of the X-books from Marvel?

MILESTONES: Conny Van Ehlsing ("the world's most monster-hunting seven-year-old") turns ten this month.  In March, 2001, she had her first public appearance as a supporting character to superhero RECEPTION MAN, in a German fanzine called PLOP. Immediately after that, Max Vaehling started Conny's own series, which has been running for four years now, with over 200 installments.  To celebrate, Max invited friends from Germany's comics and webcomics scene to contribute guest comics all month.

MARKETING: Wow, well it's more than 10 years old, but Mike Rhode's essay on the commercialization of comics is still pretty interesting.  Take a look at part 1 on his blog, ComicsDC.

MAILBAG

John writes in about his webcomic, Seven Years in Dog-Land -- a literary fantasy set in a gritty and cruel kingdom of dogs. It is an exploration of humans’ relationship nature and the human condition itself:

When Alice runs away from home to look for her lost dog, little she knows that she may never return. She stumbles upon the kingdom of Dog-Land, an alternate world where dogs are the masters, and humans, their pets.  Under the crimson sky of this misshapen realm, the sprightly ten-year-old begins her true journey – of discovering what it truly means to be human – as she seeks a way back to our world.

Terry LaBan writes about his webcomic Muktuk Wolfsbreath, Hard Boiled Shaman!:

The mean streets of LA have nothing on the frigid forests of Siberia when it comes to danger, and Muktuk Wolfsbreath needs all his shamanic power s to deal with the wicked women, thuggish tribesman, gods, demons and animal spirits he encounters as he tries to cure his clients of whatever ails them.  A unique mashup of Siberian mythology and classic detective fiction, Muktuk Wolfsbreath takes readers on a wildly entertaining, hallucinogenic journey to heaven, hell and the dark secrets that lurk behind the skin covers of reindeer herder’s tents.