Skip to main content

Webcomic Promotion

So, let's talk webcomic promotion possibilities.

Aside from posting "HYPE!" type threads here or at Talk About Comics, what are some other types of good, legitimate webcomic promotion out there to be had?

I've got a unique conundrum, because my webcomic only appears at Girlamatic, so archives are not free, therefore I can't really build an audience the "normal" way. I have to find alternate methods.

I recently bought banner ad space at Comixpedia. I might keep doing that, it's cheap.

Anyone else?

-Otis

Re: Promotion.

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

Quote:
1. Try to write a feature article on webcomics for comixpedia or an online comics site. Play expert. Try for print media as well.

Yep that always works !! :)

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

I think links or short blurbs on the front page of other comics is always a good thing - especially something like WIGU or SCR's pages - I'd bet those 8 or so comics get some traffic from that. Other webcomics are more generous with their linkage - BoxJam's Doodle, for example has been known to give links to lots of webcomics.

Doing a guest art for a guest week at another comic is another way to get your art and writing in front of another audience that might like it enough to check your comic out.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

Paul

What would be interesting is for you to tell us how your move to Keenspot impacts your audience size - I imagine you were building a pretty good audience beforehand but Keenspot has got to turbocharge that...

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

I also just advertised on some political blogs through blogads - I am getting a pretty good response, plus some of the blogs dropped me a link.

I also throw an ad on Goats now and than b/c its cheap and I like Goats. If my ad is somewhat clever I usually get some traffic from that as well.

xerexes
www.burntdogradio.com
www.comixpedia.com

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Steve Ince's picture

That sort of increase would double my current visitors. :)

I've not heard of adwords, how does it work?

Kinda horrible, but a couple of years back I had a friend who asked me to do something nice for a (very) minor celebrity's birthday-- he was friends with the minor celebrity-- and then he went around and pointed all the fans of said minor celebrity to my comic.

This is only horrible because he died a couple of days later, I did a memorial strip, and all his contacts came over to look at that. Many of them stayed-- I think my stats took a pretty permanent jump at that point. I like to think of it as a last gift but it's still a pretty horrible way to get readers.

I assure you, it weighs heavily on my mind, but I don't know quite how to promote. I'm on a few list sites, but it doesn't help all that much. Word of mouth would be good, if I had more mouths speaking words for me :)

Hmmm... I'm not sure as to how someone could promote their comic, aside from word of mouth (that's the way I've done it). I try to let links speak for themselves, generally. But I'm not sure of a way to do it that doesn't involve spam. Definitely you should submit your site to comic directories like Onlinecomics.net (and the hopefully upcoming Comixpedia directory). There's others that I use that you can check out here: http://www.bibp.com/links.htm.

-Seth

First of all, make sure your comic is to the point where it is ready to be promoted. I'm not being snobbish; I just take issue with premature promotion. Probably because I'm guilty of it as well. But , once you have more than 3 comics in your archive and you feel that you know what you are doing, here are my thoughts:
• Make friends with other webcomics/artists. Could be on a forum, through a link exchange or via guest strips. This is a really good way to get heads looking your direction. (Assuming of course, that anyone is reading the comic you are friends with)
• Hit the forums. I'm not saying spam. Get in there and become a part of the community. Meet people. I get a lot of referalls just from people clicking my signature link.
• Register with lists , directories, and top -whatever sites. This won't do a lot for you, at least in the beginning. Still, it's free and puts your name out. So why not.

I haven't tried ad banners. So I cannot comment on that method. I do know however, that I have clicked a webcomic's ad banner a time or two, so maybe they work.

Al Schroeder's picture

[quote:b432d7ccd9="Anonymous"][quote:b432d7ccd9="UpDown_Greg"]Also, I get a LOT of hits from search engines. I have the same keywords on every page. By following the IP address in the web log I can see that they usually stick around for several pages more.

I also get a lot of hits from search engines. I do something a lot of webcomic artists don't do---I use "alt" tags so Google can read the dialogue in the panels, and thus I turn up in some rather odd searches, but it's all good. Any combination of any of my dialogue might turn me up in the search engines.---Al

Sorry. That was me above. Forgot to log in.---Al

 Al Schroeder III of MINDMISTRESS---think the superhero genre is mined out? Think there are no new superhero ideas? Think again.

Webcomic Promotion

So, let's talk webcomic promotion possibilities.

Aside from posting "HYPE!" type threads here or at Talk About Comics, what are some other types of good, legitimate webcomic promotion out there to be had?

I've got a unique conundrum, because my webcomic only appears at Girlamatic, so archives are not free, therefore I can't really build an audience the "normal" way. I have to find alternate methods.

I recently bought banner ad space at Comixpedia. I might keep doing that, it's cheap.

Anyone else?

-Otis

So, let me get this straight . .

NOBODY here cares about promoting their webcomic?

-Otis

Wow, great ideas, guys! Thanks!

I agree that one shouldn't spend more time promoting than actually working. This is essential . . you have to have good content to promote.

Keep em' comin'.

-Otis

As an experiment, I'm giving Google adwords a shot. So far nothing earth shattering - 30-50 more people a day than usual. The key will be seeing what my retention rate is.

I'll keep you informed as to my success or failure.

http://adwords.google.com

These are the paid listings on google searches and showing up here and there across the net (anyplace you see a text ad and the notation 'ads by Google'). The main plus of the Google AdWords is that you choose keywords for your ad to show up in relation to.

So if, for example, someone does a search for 'webcomic' they're more likely than not to have one of my ads come up as well as the regular search results. Likewise, if someone's hosting Google ads on their site, it will match the ad to the content of the site based on how related the ad and the site are. Comic book type ads would show up on PVP, software and techie stuff would show up on slashdot.org, etc. etc.

Because Google keeps their ads unobtrusive, they seem to get a nice click through rate and aren't as readily ignored as many banner ads are.

---

general rule...

don't spend more time promoting your comic than you spend working on it...

Even if you get a bunch of people to go to your page, if there's nothing there to keep them coming back... then it's a waste.

I kidnap people's children and leave a note saying to visit my website on a regular basis or I'm sending back their daughter's toe.

That's strange....wonder why....

Good. It's fun to mess with telemarketers.

I mention a few ways to promote you comic on my comics forum Here is the post about that:http://pub22.ezboard.com/fledgermaincomicsforumfrm7.showMessage?topicID=3.topic

The sig thing is very key. 33% of my referrals are from my sig on the Wizards of the Coast message boards.

I noticed the pricing system there. how much do you pay per month for you ad?

[quote:e930d1537e="Anonymous"]Incidently, has anyone plugged their webcomic to telemarketers?

I do this all the time. They call and try to sell me storm windows or central air and I start giving them a pitch for my webcomic.

Hey, they called me.

Actually, since I signed up for the "Do Not Call" list, I haven't been called by any telemarketers. :D

Something that I've been doing for a while is handing out business cards. Have an attractive colored image from your comic or an illustration with the web address. When you make the digital file you can take it to almost any litho shop and get them printed. I send mine to the professional color lab I use for my photo business. It's good to have them looking professional, you never know who'll you meet. :)

The initial move to Keenspot didn't make a huge readership difference, however my first "newsbox" made all the difference. The newsbox is major cross promotion over all the Keenspot comics and gives you major visability. I don't have nearly the traffic I got that first newsbox day but the number of people that have been coming daily has increased since then. The Keenspot main page is the other element that gives my comic additional visability that I did not have when on Keenspace. It was also really cool to get "welcome" links and positive words from some of the other Keenspot artists. That really meant a lot! :D

you can advertise on popular webcomics, megatoyko and what nots... It's walky and Real Life they pretty up their. You can always advertise their or in any you can find. Message board someone once told me to advertise in as well. But i suppose the best way is just to get around and make fan strips to your favorite strips, make them your best work ever, becuase you want more people to come not leave, LOL

I heard about those articles things, but I never tried them nor was asked to, plus I have no idea what to really do to get one, LOL

some other ways is to put your site in goggle and MSN and some other ones. My site is found on these things and also if you put Levk you find alot of stuff that i made and signed, LOL.

Besides that their are few other good ways. word of mouth is good, but if you tell yoru friends it really does not go far. You have to get word of mouth of about 10 other people. That always help. But it is best to not spend much time on this. You are better off working on your comic and making it nice. It takes awhile for anything to really kick in and get a fan base. But don't give up easy if it does not come to you fast. Their are some comics out their that been around 2 or 3 years and does not have agreat fan base and their is some that been around 1 year and is teh best their is, so it varies really. Just don't spend more then 25% of your time promoting your site.

Re: general rule...

[quote:1ca69c6a4f="FractalDragon"]don't spend more time promoting your comic than you spend working on it...

Even if you get a bunch of people to go to your page, if there's nothing there to keep them coming back... then it's a waste.

I totally agree with you there! When I go to directories and stuff, I would click on a link and find there are only a cover, character sketches, and a 'coming soon.' Seeing that annoys me and I never go back to that site again. On the other hand, if there are a couple pages of comic that look promising, I actually go back and check it once in a while.

Sorry, I don't really have any tips on how to promote one's own site. I pretty much do what the others do--link exchange, friends, and directories. Even so I don't really try too hard to promote my site because I draw mostly for my own entertainment. Of course I don't mind getting a few visitors. :)

If you have another site/story outside of Girlmatic, I'm sure plenty of people from the subscription site would go there because you already have a reader base.

Even small multi-artist sites like mine pass a lot of viewers around between the comics, artist pages, and the gallery. Since the people stay longer checking more things out hopefully they'll bookmark it and check back on something.

I can't stress enough how important regular updating is. I have one artist on my site that updates regularly and the webstats show the rest of us for the slackers we are.

Also, I get a LOT of hits from search engines. I have the same keywords on every page. By following the IP address in the web log I can see that they usually stick around for several pages more.

Signatures work well and OnlineComics.net gives a few visits but not as much as at first. The blog idea is good too. Several of us have Blogger accounts and people follow the link to the website from there. I have mine listed in a few places that track updated blogs. I try to post often to increase the visits.

So far this month I'm averaging 16 visits, 67 pageviews and 234 hits per day. And it's growing slowly. I haven't pushed it since I've been working on the design, but it's pretty much in place now. Once a couple more comics are updating regularly (or even 1 more) then I'll try a few paid ads, and might go for something huge like a Megatokyo ad just to see what happens. I could also stand to get a new artist or two on board.

Re: general rule...

Uncle Ghastly's picture

[quote:4b54d4a808="FractalDragon"]don't spend more time promoting your comic than you spend working on it...

Even if you get a bunch of people to go to your page, if there's nothing there to keep them coming back... then it's a waste.

Yes, exactly!

Don't worry about promotion until you've got something worth promoting!

Uncle Ghastly's picture

[quote:dc6ec6cb07="Dex"]Kinda horrible, but a couple of years back I had a friend who asked me to do something nice for a (very) minor celebrity's birthday-- he was friends with the minor celebrity-- and then he went around and pointed all the fans of said minor celebrity to my comic.

This is only horrible because he died a couple of days later, I did a memorial strip, and all his contacts came over to look at that. Many of them stayed-- I think my stats took a pretty permanent jump at that point. I like to think of it as a last gift but it's still a pretty horrible way to get readers.

So then I should have killed Wil Wheaton after I had him appear in my strip?

Damn! I totally blew that opportunity.
:x

Uncle Ghastly's picture

Grrrr... I hate when I get mysteriously logged out. Previous post by me.

Uncle Ghastly's picture

Saddly we have no such list here in Canada. :(

Uncle Ghastly's picture

Yeah it's fun. They get really confused when you ignore what they're saying and talk like you're delivering a scripted sales pitch. Although I've had a few of them laugh when I start describing my comic and they said they'd have to check it out when they get home.

Uncle Ghastly's picture

Anyone who wants to look up Michael Moore's skirt is a sick, sick fuck, and that's coming from the guy who draws freakin' tentacled beasties.

We were joking on a thread about promotion on Keenspace about putting a big section of text on the bottom of our pages that's the same colour as the background with every sick and twisted perverted word you can think of.

Uncle Ghastly's picture

Without meaning to blow my own horn too much, advertising on popular webcomics seems to do a pretty good job of getting readers for you comic.

NaomZ of Zeera The Pirate bought a 10 day adbox on my site and her ranking by traffic on Keenspace jumped 139 places during those 10 days. She went from being the 212th ranked comic by traffic to the 73rd ranked comic. C.J. Burgundy of Burgundy Comics bought a 10 day adbox which expires today. During that time her ranking by traffic went from being the 139th ranked Keenspace comic to being the 7th ranked keenspace comic. Vlad Damien of My Life With Thrill Kill Karl bought a 10 day adbox. He's only on day 5 right now but already he's seen his rank by traffic jump from being #212 to being #99.

35 bucks will buy you a lot of promotional power.

The thing is, one webcomic artist to another, I don't recommend jumping into promotion right away (even though I'd be trilled to have you buy adboxes). While I can bring you the readers I can't make them stay. Only your talent can keep them. Most webcomics go through a growing period when they start. It takes them awhile to get their legs, solidify their story and characters and nail their artwork.

It is very hard to build up a readership for a webcomic, now more than ever. It can be really easy to become discouraged particularily when you look at a lot of the big webcomics and don't see them being that superior to you in terms of talent. The truth is a great many of the big webcomics are the big webcomics because they got into the game early when webcomics were a rare and new phenominon. There are tens of thousands of webcomics out there on the internet today. A new comic starting out is just one amoungst that number. Even if you are talented, with strong artwork and writing, it's going to be very difficult to get noticed. Remember that most webcomics will never, ever, gain a readership of more than 1000 regular readers. Heck, very few probably ever get more than a hundred or so people regularily reading their work. It's just that difficult to build up a readership which is why you shouldn't really get into the biz with the goal of being the next MegaTokyo or Penny Arcade as your driving motivation. If the love of doing the comic isn't your number one motivating factor then chances are you're going to become very angry and very bitter.

Still, everyone likes to be able to reach an audience and in order to reach an audience you're going to have to rely upon more than just your drawing and writing talents. It's not 1999 anymore. Word of mouth isn't going to cut it for promoting your webcomic, at least not until you've built up your readership to a level where you've got enough mouths talking about it to promote it.

However, as I have said, you really shouldn't worry about promoting your comic until you honestly feel you have something that is worth promoting. Before you buy advertising and launch a promotional campaign ask yourself honestly if your work is truly worth the money the advertising will cost you.

It can be hard to look objectively at your own work but if you really sit down and examine where your art and writing is, where your story is at, where your character development is, you should be able to figure out if you're ready or if you need a little more time to become ready. If you're uncomfortable with the idea of spending $35 to promote your work then chances are you're not ready to promote your work. Ads will bring people in but only you can keep them coming back. When you're truly confident enough in your work that you're certain the investment in advertising will pay off with return readers then you're ready. Go nuts. Promote to the hilt.

Trust me, you don't want a lot of attention aimed at your work when you're not ready to receive it yet. If you've only been at it a month or so and you're not breaking more than a few hundred readers yet it's probably too early to worry about promotion yet. Just concentrate on your comic, there will be no shortage of sites you can advertise your work on once you get ready.

Uncle Ghastly's picture

[quote:185d90912c="TragicLad"]As an experiment, I'm giving Google adwords a shot. So far nothing earth shattering - 30-50 more people a day than usual.

Let's see Google adwords cost a minumum 5 cents per click if I'm reading their site correctly. So 30 clicks per day would cost $1.50. Multiplied over 10 days that would cost you $15 in advertising and net you 300 new readers.

Now on my site it isn't cost-per-click but I know I was throwing about 300 new readers per day to NaomZ when she advertised on my site, and currently Krazy Krow is advertising on my site and according to his Extreme Tracker I'm throwing over 400 new readers at his site per day.

Either I'm misreading what Google charges per click or you could be getting a much better bang for your buck advertising on my site.

Of course being able to advertise your site visually with an animated GIF or a JPEG as opposed to using only plain text which the Google ads are is a pretty good bonus.

I'm just sayin' is all.
:wink:

i'm still working on some sorta promotion like...FREE BEER!...or BOOBS GALORE!

the details need a little ironing out though.

that actually reminds me of a good friend that would add shamless 'web hit generating text' on his blog. it would always refer to something in the news. like today the text might be "Olsen Twins Nude" or "Michael Moore Up-the-skirt cam". You'd be suprised at how many hits he got (the latter excluded). his site is www.luboknovich.blogspot.com.

[quote:510093f765="Ghastly"]
We were joking on a thread about promotion on Keenspace about putting a big section of text on the bottom of our pages that's the same colour as the background with every sick and twisted perverted word you can think of.

hey...joke all you want. it works! :wink:

I never have a webcomic, but I did a lot of reserach(still thristy for more)
All of you guys are right. Some of you say the same thing as so many others.
For a point, sometime people are really lucky to adversite on a popluar site, or just plain lucky.
It may takes skill, determination, and lucks to get a decent fanbase.
However, simply promoting not going to bring much, other than having a good webcomic( to makes reader stay), if you doing an ad on a popluar website, you might put a "click me" to get more reader to go to your website. There many way to promote, or promote better.
If you do reserach on how to promote your website, you will found tons of useful tips.

Uncle Ghastly's picture

Alt tags are great but what's even better if you have a gallery is to include text with the image that talks about the image, the technique used to create it, what's going on in the picture, what inspired it, etc. The more text you have on your site the more things that will be picked up by search engines.

I rather enjoy going through my search string stats and looking at some of the weird (and often disturbing) search strings that brought people to my site.

Needless to say "tentacles" is pretty high on that list.

Uncle Ghastly's picture

[quote:c1e9130835="bluezombie"]Ghastly: I looked at your ad site, it sounds like you have a lot of success - so if I may ask, how did you go about promoting your website and getting so much traffic, enough to boost everyone else's traffic?

I'm one of the "got in early when there wern't as many webcomics" guys.

Quote:

$35 isn't much at all, it's a good deal, only the content of our webcomic is so vastly different than yours and caters to a different audience that I don't think it'd work necessarily as well for ours.

As long as your comic is a quality work it shouldn't matter. Vlad Damien currently has an ad up and running on my site and his work is vastly different from mine too, and there's not an ounce of fanservice in his ad, He's moved up from being the 212th comic ranked by traffic on Keenspace to being the 83rd ranked comic and he still has a few days left to go.

The people who read my comic arn't any different from the people who read other webcomics. In fact, when I follow my referals back to people's bookmark and links pages I often see Sexy Loser and Ghastly's Ghastly Comic in their lists right beside a lot of G-Rated and PG-Rated comics. I don't think of my readers as people who like adult comics, I think of them just as people who like comics. Their interests are broad and diverse.

Quote:

BTW, I haven't met anyone who lives in Hamilton in all my forays on the Net.. I am an ex-Ontarian myself, though I never lived in Hamilton, lived in lotsa other 'burbs north of TO tho. Hamilton... land of Tim Hortons. I miss Tim Hortons, being in Vancouver where there aren't so many. Pooh.

Yeah, you can't go more than 25 metres without hitting a Tim's here in Hamilton. It's the law. I've been quite surprised at just how many Hamiltonians I run into during my net travels.

Quote:

What mid to high-traffic popular webcomics would you all suggest to advertise on?

Why Ghastly's Ghastly Comic of course.
:lol:

One of the reasons why my advertising is so affordable is I'm not doing the webcomic as a business. I just have to cover the bandwidth and art expenses and I'm perfectly happy. I've already got a killer day-job so my comic can remain a stress-free hobby for me. I wanted to be able to offer advertising primarily for my fellow Keenspace artists (or any webcomic artist really) who would otherwise not be able to afford the opportunity to employ the promotional power of a high traffic comic.

The reason I offer advertising at all is because of an incident that happened with Keen's regular sponsor, Burst. I did a strip that Burst felt crossed the line and they told Keen to yank their ads from my site and Keen had no choice but to comply. Better to lose the ad revinue from one site, even if it is a high traffic site, than to lose the ad revinue from them all. Unfortunately with the way Keenspace is set up right now, unlike Keenspot, they have no ability to sell targeted advertising on Keenspace.

I'm too proud a man to take charity so I wasn't going to be able to remain on Keenspace if I wasn't contributing something to the overall success of Keen. Well I was contributing a lot of spin-off traffic to other Space comics now that Space had its own Newsbox, but other than that I was just dead bandwidth. Plus I'm sure Keen would have gotten sick of carrying my ass after awhile and knowing how the Keen Kommittee reaches decisions by the time they came up with a solution to the problem I would have been long gone. So I needed to come up with a solution myself.

I made a deal with Chris Crosby that I'd stay on Keen but sell my own advertising. If I had unsold adspace I'd use it to promote Keenspace and Keenspot and whatever money was made from the ads I'd split 50-50 with Keen.

Had I known then that it would have been so successful I would have drawn Jesus having sex years ago because it's been a win-win for everybody.

Keen still gets to take advantage of the promotional power of my strip for its own purposes by using unsold adspace. They get some money off the sold ads on my page which is infinitely superior to getting no money. I get some money off the sold ads on my page which is also infinitely superior to getting no money. My fellow webcomic artists are able to benefit from really low advertising rates to promote their work. Since most of the webcomics that have bought adspace have been fellow Keenspace comics the over-all pageviews for Keenspace increase thus earning Keen more advertising revinue off the other Space titles that advertise on my site. The people who buy advertising on my site know what they're getting into when they buy the ads so nobody will be complaining about ass sex making Baby Jesus cry.

It's made looking at the Keen Guide more fun for me too. Once I became the #1 comic on the Guide traffic rankings there was a "well now where do I go" kind of feeling. Now I get to enjoy watching my fellow Spacer's who buy ads go up through the ranks.

Promotion.

:? Let me see. Thoughts.
1. Try to write a feature article on webcomics for comixpedia or an online comics site. Play expert. Try for print media as well.

2. Try to get a plug on the radio. Like a comics hour like 'Nuff Said on WBAI in New York.

3. Try to get interviewed on a comics fan website.

4. Get your bio into the web comics directory as well as your comics link.

5. Build a simple site one page with links to a few clips of your work not featured on the main site as well as a brief bio and picture.

Just thoughts.

I just bought a mac hall ad the other day, and for my $30 for two days I got 4 days cause they don't often update. :D very nice indeed. Lots o hits.

---Frodo
onlinecomic.net

[quote:4a8f629d17="UpDown_Greg"]Also, I get a LOT of hits from search engines. I have the same keywords on every page. By following the IP address in the web log I can see that they usually stick around for several pages more.

I also get a lot of hits from search engines. I do something a lot of webcomic artists don't do---I use "alt" tags so Google can read the dialogue in the panels, and thus I turn up in some rather odd searches, but it's all good. Any combination of any of my dialogue might turn me up in the search engines.---Al

Ghastly: I looked at your ad site, it sounds like you have a lot of success - so if I may ask, how did you go about promoting your website and getting so much traffic, enough to boost everyone else's traffic?

$35 isn't much at all, it's a good deal, only the content of our webcomic is so vastly different than yours and caters to a different audience that I don't think it'd work necessarily as well for ours.

BTW, I haven't met anyone who lives in Hamilton in all my forays on the Net.. I am an ex-Ontarian myself, though I never lived in Hamilton, lived in lotsa other 'burbs north of TO tho. Hamilton... land of Tim Hortons. I miss Tim Hortons, being in Vancouver where there aren't so many. Pooh.

I have been thinking of adwords, perhaps later on in the game. Has anyone here advertised on Comixpedia itself and gotten a good clickthrough rate? We're thinking of doing that as well.

Other than that, has anyone advertised on other high traffic comic sites other than Megatokyo, Penny Arcade, Real Life(too pricey for my poor student budget right now) - and gotten good results? What mid to high-traffic popular webcomics would you all suggest to advertise on?

Word of mouth worked well for us. Also onlinecomics sponsorship helps to bring in people everyday, and working with Josh over there is great. Other than that, hmm... some spiffy webcomics out there linked us, like Eidolic Fringe(hi Joe!), Star Cross'd Destiny(one of my favourites), and Wish3(also very spiffy). Honestly, it just takes time, like everyone else has been saying... time to settle down, time to get in tune with the art and the traffic and the story, time to just develop and mature. And as FractalDragon said, it's important to have something worth promoting before you start promoting. True that there are tons of webcomics out there, but you don't need to spend tons of money if you have something worth caring about and worth reading regularly - a bit of promo here and there and the rest slowly falls into place, slowly but surely. Aggressive marketing campaigns for webcomics is more of a turn off I think - Demonology 101 is hugely popular and successful and she never did a thing to promote, believe it or not.

Maybe it's a Canadian thing. :D

Untapped promotion opportunity: Cons

Onezumi's picture

I've noticed that not many webcomics are going to cons. Usually it's just the "top few" who go. Considering that an artist alley spot at Otakon (a huge Anime con with 20K+ attendance) only costs like $20, it's crazy not to get a spot. If you can afford it the vending areas are a better deal. You usually end up with a link on their website for a few months and a write up in their program guide. If you consider the costs for regular advertising it's a steal for the number of people who will see it. At the very least it'll pay for your attendance and get you some exposure. onezumi.comhas been at 2 cons so far and we have 3 more coming up in the next few months. It's been working great for us. We now have readers all over the country, people who we'd never have been able to reach otherwise.

My Webcomics / Internet Culture Convention: http://www.InterventionCon.com

Stupid and Insane Defenders Against Chaos: http://www.Onezumi.com

Incidently, has anyone plugged their webcomic to telemarketers?

I do this all the time. They call and try to sell me storm windows or central air and I start giving them a pitch for my webcomic.

Hey, they called me.

RE: Untapped promotion opportunity: Cons

Hello,

Myself and colleagues are currently in the process of producing a community website directed at entertainment. Reviews, Interviews and such forth will be included for the many sectors of entertainment as well as a large community base with online registration, etc.

To help spice up the website we are looking for webcomic artists that would like their work to be used on the website. By this i mean that the home page of the website will display a webcomic, and members can choose which to show on their home page.

We are looking for at maximum 5 webcomic artists for the website, and obviously this is a great chance for promotion of your work. Currently the only requirement is that the width of your comic is no larger than 500px as it would destroy the design else (we are seeing how much leeway we can give atm).

If you are interested please contact me at mcswainysun at hotmail dot com. Through this we can give you more details on the website. Please attatch a preview of your work.

[ There are loose details in post as the website is in development and is hoping to stay anonymous until launch ]