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Important People in Webcomics in 2004?

Here's a question - name someone you thought made a big impact in webcomics this year - either artistically, in business or any other way you think was important. It could be because of something the person did this year alone or it could be of things they kept on doing.

Important People in Webcomics in 2004?

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

Here's a question - name someone you thought made a big impact in webcomics this year - either artistically, in business or any other way you think was important. It could be because of something the person did this year alone or it could be of things they kept on doing.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Joey Manley's picture

I'm afraid it'll be 2005 ... yargh.

Joey
www.moderntales.com

Derek Kirk Kim wins an Eisner.

Randy Milholland, Jeff Rowland and Jeph Jacques begin to try to make a living off of webcomics.

Jeff Rowland is also bitten by a brown recluse. He receives an outpouring of goodwill from readers and other webcartoonists but, as of yet, no (new) discernable super powers.

Jan Van Tol sparks controversy with his webcomic ripping program, Comictastic.

It's Walky and Bite Me draw to a close.

A new webcomics publication, The Webcomics Examiner, arrives on the scene.

Eric Burns begins snarking.

Keenspot begins offering webcomics to newspapers in the form of an insert. And buys a school.

Webcartoonists begin incorporating RSS feeds into their websites. Among the webcomics that currently have RSS feeds: Penny Arcade, Diesel Sweeties, Megatokyo, Achewood, Goats, and every comic on Keenspace.

Joey Manley launches SmallPressSwapmeet.com, the first of his "WebcomicsNation" applications to be released.

That's about all I can think of for now. I'll add more if anything comes to mind.

- Ben

RE: Important People in Webcomics in 2004?

Erik Melander's picture

There are three that I instantly think of when reading your question.
Chris Crosby, Scott Kurtz and Kazu Kibuishi.
The first two may seem like the standard personas who get mentioned as important for webcomics, but what Im thinking about in particular is the syndication schemes. Both have devised syndication schemes that compete with the traditional print syndicates and gotten quite a lot of attention for it. It remains to be seen wheather this will actually lead to something significant, but the seed is there.
Kazu Kibuishi because he is the driving force behind the Flight anthology that has got a lot of interest. Most of the creators participating in the first volume are published on the web (even though many of the are small pressers as well) and I think that Flight being picked up by Image has meant a lot of attention for webcomics.

Uncle Ghastly's picture

Joey Manley if Webcomics Nation is up and running in 2004. :D

Uncle Ghastly's picture

[quote:2d983f4273="joeymanley"]I'm afraid it'll be 2005 ... yargh.

Joey
www.moderntales.com

Well you get a consolation prize for your haiku.

RE: Important People in Webcomics in 2004?

m_estrugo's picture

Well, it's rather soon to do a balance of the important things on webcomics that happened this year... it may be just myself, but I think the webcomics industry is kind of stalled since 2002 or so. A little shocking, especially if we consider how fast was the evolution of webcomics between, let's say, 1998 and 2002... the world of webcomics has been more of the same since the huge leap forward that took place on those years: the same successful webcomics, the same élite, and of course, the same techniques... I've got no doubt there have been many attempts by many artists to push the envelope a little further, but they're obscured by ... the webcomics establishment, to call it some way.

Leaving those problems aside, and trying to concentrate on Xerexes' question, I'd mention Scott Kurtz as the person with the most impact on webcomics on this year, especially when he declared he'd offer his comic strip to newspapers for free to compete against syndicates.

Scott Kurtz is an unique webcartoonist, both a competent artist and a sharp businessman in the same person. He managed to create a funny strip that appeals a lot of Internet users, and knows how to use that popularity for his own benefit, thus making PvP a model to follow by many other artists and cartoonists.

I ignore how things went with the newspaper syndication project, if it's going to bomb or will be a resounding success. History will tell if this was a brilliant move by a webcomics pioneer or a ruining move by a selfish cartoonist... but on the meantime, I'll mention that... well, that's precisely the way to -make- history.


Eric Burns's picture

[quote:732a7a1637="joeymanley"]I'm afraid it'll be 2005 ... yargh.

I like to take my time
I mean that when I want to do a thing
I like to take my time to do it right!

I mean I might just make mistakes
If I should have to hurry up and
So I like to take my time
To tie my shoes, to eat, to get dressed,
To go to sleep at night to sings a song for you
And every thing I do.

I like to take my time
I mean that when I want to do a thing
I like to take my time to do it right.

I mean I might just make mistakes if
I should have to hurry up and
So I like to take my time.

--in other words, Mister Rogers is wise as always. Do it right. We have faith, sir.