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How can I justify spending so much time on this?

I really care about my webcomic, but it's really hard to get readers. I'm doing it as a "long haul" kind of thing, a la Dave Sim, except that he had a plan to make MONEY off of it, and I don't. I want to submit this to more experienced web cartoonists, or anybody who feels like they could or would (or wouldn't) be one, and ask, What makes you do this? Is there a plan? Are we all doomed to be starving artists, or people with lame day jobs who do this as a hobby?

I promised myself that I was going to do one comic book for each book of the Bible, and I plan to. I love the creative freedom, and I like putting my ideas in artistic form, and it's always good to have a project, but...

It just seems like there's so much thoughtless crap out there, and the MOST online cartoonists seem to hope for is to EVENTUALLY get to the "Sluggy Freelance" point where they sell so many T-shirts and overpriced books, and beg for money SO OFTEN, and become SO FORMULAIC that the cartoonist can sort of make a meager living by doing it.

Is there something I don't know? Are we working on some awesome, high-tech way to get paid for our work? Do e-mails from obsessed fans really make it all worth it? Do we do it because we have to?

Does ANYONE ELSE feel this way? Ever?

Cashiavellis
chuckcomics.com

How can I justify spending so much time on this?

I really care about my webcomic, but it's really hard to get readers. I'm doing it as a "long haul" kind of thing, a la Dave Sim, except that he had a plan to make MONEY off of it, and I don't. I want to submit this to more experienced web cartoonists, or anybody who feels like they could or would (or wouldn't) be one, and ask, What makes you do this? Is there a plan? Are we all doomed to be starving artists, or people with lame day jobs who do this as a hobby?

I promised myself that I was going to do one comic book for each book of the Bible, and I plan to. I love the creative freedom, and I like putting my ideas in artistic form, and it's always good to have a project, but...

It just seems like there's so much thoughtless crap out there, and the MOST online cartoonists seem to hope for is to EVENTUALLY get to the "Sluggy Freelance" point where they sell so many T-shirts and overpriced books, and beg for money SO OFTEN, and become SO FORMULAIC that the cartoonist can sort of make a meager living by doing it.

Is there something I don't know? Are we working on some awesome, high-tech way to get paid for our work? Do e-mails from obsessed fans really make it all worth it? Do we do it because we have to?

Does ANYONE ELSE feel this way? Ever?

Cashiavellis
chuckcomics.com

RE: How can I justify spending so much time on this?

Well, it can be a bit like that, cashiavellis ^_^
I just had an argument with my mum about what direction my life is heading in. Maybe I've watched too much anime, or I just live with my head in the clouds... but here's my two cents.

I think it's great for anyone to get enough motivation to start off a webcomic, or any comic in fact. And although it's nice to get fanmails and people saying it's great work I don't think that's the most important. It's nice to make money off this kind of work, but the reality is, it's hard. Because it's such a small field. People seem to think it's much bigger because of the number that do read it, but think of comic makers sort of like those Indian bead threaders, and most publishers and shops that sell the comics as jewellery stores ^^;...

The point is, the creation of comics is on the backend, so unless you are etraordinary and is discovered by someone, there's not much money to be made in it. That's not to say someone couldn't become that way inclined and do make money.

There's a long road to making yourself good enough that people will hire you, and if they are paying you they need to be very very impressed with what you do.

I made a decision though, and because of that decision, I want to keep to it. It's my dream to keep producing manga. To keep creating, letting people see what is in my mind, giving them my dreams and what my imagination holds. I think it's a more realistic reason than money, or fans. If I have to keep a job I don't like in order to do something I love I think it's worth it. To be able to do what you want to dedicate yourself to must be the greatest happiness in the world.

I'm lucky, I have a paid project at the moment, but nothing is stable in comics, after this one I might not get another. But I will know that I've been working on what I want to do, that I made this decision.

So I understand what you're saying, but no I don't feel that way. Just to be able to put pencil to paper everyday is a great happiness for me. It's tiring sometimes, especially doing paid jobs, since there are so many rules and changes, but the best time of day for me is still the moment I start creating. I hope you feel that way too about your comic.

Because otherwise your readers won't feel the same about it, and if you don't love it, how will they? ^_-

RE: How can I justify spending so much time on this?

You have to enjoy it. That's the only way to justify it.

So many hours of our daily lives are spent doing non-trascendental things that aren't even that enjoyable -like TV or videogames, or standing in line somewhere, waiting for people that are late, stuck in traffic, that you have to see it in that perspective. To do something that's satisfying to you.

Now, if you want to do it full-time, you have to look into making it a business. There's no other way around. But don't expect the world to make a path to your door. You have to make it your own.

Maritza
CRFH.net

RE: How can I justify spending so much time on this?

Bryan Prindiville's picture

Gotta admit I agree with Maritza, if you don't love it, why do it.

Me, I'm lucky because I have a decent day job and have made the specific decision that my strip is a hobby until it proves otherwise.

I can't imagine that there is any webtoonist that hasn't felt that way at one point or another. I've only recently been getting an "real" sort of readership and thats purely out of the good graces of a fellow toonist that didn't particularly think my stuff was all that bad.

-bry
bassetville.net

scarfman's picture

I do it because I have to. I put daily cartoons on the web because it's the best distribution method available to me - if not the best ever - and not because I wouldn't be drawing them if the web wasn't there, which I would (I have about two dozen blue binders from the 70s and 80s to prove that).

If I'd started this when I was only thirty-five I might try to make a business out of it (not least since if I'd started when I was thirty-five I'd now be one of webcomics' old men like Jim and Scott and J.D.), but nowadays that 401K plan is just too attractive. I still wouldn't mind making money off of something I'd be doing anyway - but I'd be doing it anyway.

I do it because it's fun. Cartooning is my recreation time, if I wasn't drawing a webcomic I would probably spend that time playing video games or watching tv.

I don't care who you are: whether you're Pete Abrams, Scott Adams or the Pope, if you don't ask yourself "what the hell am I doing" a few times a year, you're probably not very self-aware.

Well, except John Paul II wouldn't say "hell."

Townie's picture

After you've been doing a comic long enough, you get pretty self-aware. Some people may only do it as a hobby and be happy with a handful of readers. Some might think of it as a small business. The thing is, you have to figure out what your site means to you. To me, my website is the one place where I have total say and control. It's also the biggest and longest running work I've done to date. Does that mean I'll keep at it until the day I die? No. It means it's helped me develop dedication. And if I should ever decide to start over with something fresh, I can count it all as practice for doing something better. I've seen a lot of sites come and go because they think they can become the next PA over night. It's not that easy. Even if you are talented, you have to fit the right conditions, have some semblance of a plan, and be persistant at it. Figure out realistic goals and achieve them. That's the only way you'll get anywhere. The web has a lot of potential for storytelling, be it professional or amature hobby, and it's barely being tapped even now.

- Ben

Tim  Demeter's picture

Well, I think the bottom line is we should all be so lucky to have the opportuinty to even HAVE an audience. Not too long ago if you wanted to create something and show it to anyone other than those you know, you better have the bank for the printers and the distribution process.

That said, I agree the decsion needs to made if your comic is a potential livlihood, or a hobby. If it's the former, yeah, you will gut-check yourself from time to time, but at the same time, if you want to suceed you need to keep your nose to the grindstone. I also believe that diversifying is key as well. I love webcomics as a genre more than I ever thought I would, but the sad fact of the matter is that for the time-being the vast majoirty of the small amount of money in comics is in the print world so if you want to quit your day job, you need to make yourself available to print publishers too, becasue the number of webcomics creators who are making it on the web alone is a rather heart-breaking ratio.

Personally, I find fan reaction IS enough, most days. Like I said above, I'm happy merely to have the opportunity to get something that I sweat blood over in front of people who might get a little appreciation from that effort.

Tim Demeter
Reckless Life
graphicsmash.com
misfit-media.com

Tim Demeter
does a bunch of neato stuff.
Clickwheel
GraphicSmash
Bustout Odds

Chris Cantrell's picture

Half the fun of most trips is getting there. Don't focus so much on the destination and just enjoy the ride.

Haunted Pixel Studios www.hauntedpixelstudios.com

I started a comic to practice drawing and learn how to tell stories.

Still the reason I do it. It's kept me going for almost two years now, five if you count my non-webcomics.

I'd say it's a pretty good reason ;)

After thinking about this sort of thing a lot myself, I have come to the decision that I keep making webcomics because I'm a retard.

I don´t know what keeps you doing the comics, but let me tell what keeps me reading them.
I´m an average surfer I search the net for various things, and occasionally I enjoy searching for humour.
The first touch I had with web based comics was with two very funny sites, sexylosers.com and choppingblock.org.
I didn´t know what to excpect but these two blew me away and i haven´t looked back since.
I was so impressed I started looking all over for other similar content and that´s how I landed in here.
I´m standing with my mouth open just from the respect towards the innumerable hours but over for each comic and I still hold the
irrational expect to have updates everyday. Anyway my point is that I think these are done for the pleasure of the readers and of the makers.
And that is how it should be.

Anonymous reader from Finland

justify

I think William G. had the best answer.

chuckcomics.com

Quote:

Are we all doomed to be starving artists, or people with lame day jobs who do this as a hobby?

Not at all! I do my webcomic as a hobby... while looking for a lame day job.

The secret is to enjoy it! I have been keeping my web page for some years now, and I haven’t have any substantial money reward (with rare exceptions of commissioned works and print sales) But most of the time my only reward is emails and fan art from a few loyal readers.

I have done some long projects and I'm working on more. If you have a lot of fans, you could make some money by placing advertising banners on your page.

Personally, I do it because I enjoy drawing and telling stories.

Jamie Robertson's picture

Sometimes I just don't know why I do this, and other times I can't imagine doing anything else.

Jamie

Al Schroeder's picture

I do it because no one publishes any more the comics I like to read. The Silver Age stuff, which expanded horizons and a sense of wonder, and introduced new concepts. All the major companies are rehashing what Stan and JAck, Stan and Steve, and Gardner Fox and whomever did decades ago. So I do it myself.
---Al

 Al Schroeder III of MINDMISTRESS---think the superhero genre is mined out? Think there are no new superhero ideas? Think again.

Okay, the consensus is that it's pretty unlikely a person could live off of a webcomics related profits. It is a kind of curse even, the need to create comics. Why can't I have a passion for Cisco Routers?

So, given what profit is available, who has experienced which approach works well and why?

I had a passion for building PCs once... but everytime I turned around I had to go back to a class or some crap -- got to expensive.

*ahem*

As to your question... I think Eric Burns (or rather Weds) from WebSnark.com put it rather succintly today:

Quote:
I've said it before -- someone who does webcomics but doesn't make it their primary source of income doesn't owe us anything. That hasn't changed. But people who read webcomics owe you nothing without regular updates. If you want to build up readers and emotions and have people care deeply about you over the course of time -- and hand in hand with that, create those mythical contacts -- then do your comic. Do it every day you say it'll be there. Make it something people bookmark and read on a regular basis, because they count on it. Give it time. Talk it up. Make sure people know it's there and make sure new ones keep coming.

Or, as Weds put it, better than I... "Shut the fuck up and draw something."

~Liriel

cashiavellis, you can justify spending so much time on doing your webcomic because "you enjoy it!" Thats the only goal webcomic creators seem to forget they're supposed to have when they first start off with their own creation. Anything after that like readership, sales, success, t-shirts blah blah blah are all + signs!! Until then dont be so concerned with how your sites doing, be concerned with how your doing with it! 1st day its unpopular. 2nd day, who knows? Do you? Coz i dont and no one else will!!

Wolfman

p.s. Shit, I didn't know i could swear on this forum or i woulda :lol:

www.bloodyashell.com

Uhm... not to encourage swearing or anything... but my WebSnark quote wouldn't have had the same impact if I had censored it.

At any rate you make a good point. As another wise man said:

"Do it for love, because it's harder to sell out than you think." -- Matt Groening (The Simpsons creator)

~Liriel

Quote:
Uhm... not to encourage swearing or anything... but my WebSnark quote wouldn't have had the same impact if I had censored it.

:shock: As another wise man said also:

"DOH!" -- (Homer Simpson)

Wolfman

If I read the pitiful whinings of one more snot-faced shit who's been doing his comic for less than a year, and who then takes an unwarranted shot at a comic which has been around for 5-8 years and has dutifully put in the day-to-day grinding work, the attention to its craft, the care for its readers, the sheer creative brain-sweat to get the fanbase they have....

....then I guess I will have spent one more day in the webcomics community. You don't know the first goddamn thing about Sluggy Freelance if you think it's gotten formulaic. If anything, Pete's catching flak for branching out in new directions. You know nothing. You're pretending to ask for answers, but you don't want anything but undeserved attention. You're a whinging little titty-baby. You are a freshman among grad students and doctoral candidates.

I can't add anything to the "STFU and draw something" except "...N00B." Do your comic for another year and we'll give you a coupon for one free complaint about webcomics in general.

-Sock Puppet

Sounds like I hit a soft spot, Sock Puppet. The comment wasn't about the quality of Sluggy Freelance, and if you can tell me with a straight face that there aren't THOUSANDS of Sluggy readers who only want to see Bun-Bun pull a knife or Kiki act hyper, or that Abrams's books are a steal at the price, or that Pete has never ever begged for money (I recall months of "Come on, keep Sluggy alive, guys"), then I will eat my own words. But I won't. Because all of these things are true. The comic may be the best thing since sliced bread, but that's not the point.

But you opened a forum that was labeled "How can I justify spending so much time on this", in a website of comics forums. What did you think would be here? Even if I am "begging for undeserved attention", I didn't exactly hide what it was about, did I?

Now, if you had opened a forum that said "Hey let's all whack off to that Sluggy Freelance comic that can do no wrong", and I called it "formulaic", then you would have a point. Sorry I struck your nerve.

chuckcomics.com

"How can I justify spending so much time on this" ---->DECODE----> "Hey people with real comics come look at my shitty startup and give me insincere encouragement I haven't earned and maybe link me pleasepleaseplease?"

And now, those facts you ordered:

1. Sluggy books are woefully UNDERpriced vs. the books of any nonsyndicated comic from another publisher.

2. The "save Sluggy" drive was meant to last ONE month and ended in THREE DAYS.

3. It does not matter what the Sluggites want, Pete Abrams creates the comic he wants to create, and people come to read it.

You are factually incorrect, because why? You know nothing. Shut The Fuck Up And Draw N00B!

It's not about Sluggy or any other comic you choose to attack. It's about your fucking mouth and your lack of knowledge, insight, experience or accomplishment to back it up. You have not earned the right to hold up Sluggy or MT or PA or CAD or PvP or Mac Hall or 8BT or S*P or UF or any other megahit comic as a negative example. Seriously, you are one of those people who is ignorant about the extent of his own ignorance. You are not saying "I know nothing, teach me!" You are saying "I know everything! Prove me wrong!" Well there's no justification for spending time on THAT.

You

Know

NOTHING.

Now shut your fucking yap until you have some IDEA what understanding it is you lack. Want a free starter clue? Nobody cares if your comic lives or dies but you. There ya go, Sparky. Have fun at Camp STFU.

Katie Sekelsky's picture

A comment on the thing about webomic "n00bs" not being entitled to criticize webomics "veterans" ... people can have opinions about anything, even if they happen to be biased, unfair, and unfounded. This scenario is just as legit as a sportscaster who's not an athlete criticizing a major league football play or something. Or a non-actor criticizing a cinema classic.

People who've been in the webcomics 'scene' longer may have different opinions on certain webcomics. They obviously have more of an idea of what it's like to deal with the shit webcomic artists/writers have to deal with. So it naturally makes sense that they tend to have more respect for other cartoonists. However, comic rookies or even comic outsiders still have the right to criticize whatever they want (even if their backing evidence for comments may be weak or nonexistant). And sometimes (not implying anything about Sluggy here, as honestly, I don't even regularly read Sluggy), the comments may be true. I'm sure in some cases, other webcomic veterans may be more lenient, thinking "well... they've got a lot of stress with deadlines and all," as opposed to the casual reader looking and thinking, "wow, the art here has really gone downhill." And most comics don't have a readership comprised of only other cartoonists. Sometimes it's good to hear the opinion of the average reader, who only reads at the comic at face value. Because honestly, though it's hard to face, the average reader doesn't care how much time is involved or how stressfull stuff is. They just want to be able to see and read something that's good.

And of course, everyone else is free to disagree with opinions of the average reader or the comic noob. Just like everyone else is free to disagree with every word I've just typed.

Whoa... what's with the n00b hatin'? Dang people, we were all n00bs once too y'know... sheesh.

~Liriel

SOCK PUPPET!! I read what you had to say and i couldnt stop pissing myself laughing. Funny as fcuk :lol: I agree with most or all of what you had to say (expect the bitching between you and cashiavellis. Thats between u guys but its great reading...keep it up :wink: ) I agree with what your saying about webcomic newbies...u need to give respect to gain respect (still doesnt mean I'll bend over backwards and take it in the ass! I'm maybe a newbie at doing webcomics, but i'm NOT a newbie at DRAWING comics.) So sometimes newbies have more to offer than the "much older and more mystical webcomic veterans".

I think that when a webcomic reaches a certain level of popularity the creator needs to ask for some support to keep the webcomic on the net!! I almost hit a nerve last month when i thought my bandwidth usage almost ran out on me for feb. Luckily feb only had 28 days :D

Anyway heres some help i got when i first started out and needed some guidance ....

Quote:
Dear Anthony,

Honestly, there really isn't anything you can do that I'm sure you don't already know.
Pimp your comic, promote it when you can, without being annoying or a complete whore.
Talk to people; get involved in forums.
Send email to people in positions of authority.
Buy advertising space.
Practise your art all the damn time.
Keep the writing original. There are a million comics out there. Stand out!
Have fun, its just a hobby, right?

I've flipped through your comic quickly and I like what I see so far. Good art, keen
stuff. So far I'd say you've got a good thing going. I'll really sit down and read
this thing when I have the chance but time is a hot commodity for me lately.

This month HBP will be holding a spotlight type-thing. I'd say you're a shoe-in, but there's not much we can do. Go forth and conquer.

Yours,
-Razi Oak, HBP Mailroom Clerk

I never got around to doing that spotlight thing as i took his advice and pimped my stuff through every webcomic/gaming, anything-i'm-interested in-forum i could find.

Wolfman

[quote:5d3ffc591b="Anonymous"]Blah blah blah

-Sock Puppet
Someone who's too much of a pussy to use their real name or ID when laying the law down is someone to be ignored for having no balls.

So, Sock Puppet, I'll START by assuming that you have been doing your own webcomic for many years. If you HAVEN'T, then, by your own logic, you should not be allowed to talk to me.

I mean, seriously, do you even think these forums should exist? How would your perfect comic world work, Anonymous? Would seniority be the only thing that mattered? You would "earn tokens" that allow you to disagree with "vets"? This is the INTERNET, it's not the army.

It seems like you have just used your "one free complaint coupon" about the webcomics community (all these NOOBS bitch too much) and need to shut up now. That is, if you are a man of principle.

By the way, we've all seen a Kevin Smith movie. No one is impressed by your swearing. We all know how to type cuss words.

Assume what you like. I'm not playing twenty questions about my identity. The anonymity is so people will answer the message instead of attacking the messenger. You and william g still try and attack the person, though.

The message is this: Webcomics are a tough and complicated. The people who have big audiences worked hard for a long time to get them and keep them. They've learned their business the hard way. Every day, a hundred more kids start webcomics, and a few like you walk in and start acting like you know what's going on. It is exactly the same as if the guy from the mail room walked into the board meeting and started spouting off about what's wrong with the chairman and CEO.

Appreciate how hard it will be to accomplish what you are setting out to, and you won't be so quick to take potshots at those who have achieved success already. Humility, integrity, maturity, resolve, patience...these things will serve you better than the bullshit you've pulled by starting this thread.

Yeah, this is the INTERNET, not the army. But this specific part of the internet is a COMMUNITY, not a public landfill. Until you have accomplished something that the community values, your voice is a small and unimportant one. Sluggy has 2,000 times your readership, meaning for every 10 readers you have, Pete could fill a stadium. So maybe you ought not to debut in the community with a big, "What? Is that shit the best anyone can do?"

And I'll fucking swear when I fucking feel like it. Fucker.

-Sock Puppet

Hey there Sock Puppet. Don't get me wrong, because you raise a bunch of valid points...but you should come clean on who you are if you're going to keep moving the ball down the field -- so we can at least see what your WWW pedigree is. I think we should be honest with one another. I can bomb anonymously, just like anyone else can. Step up to the plate.

Attacking the messenger? Oh my goodness! What kind of asshole would DO such a thing? Whew, I get scared just thinking about it.

Limp Bizkit has had many more listeners and fans than, say, Modest Mouse. Does that mean that Modest Mouse should "shut the fuck up" until their record sales equal Limp Bizkit's? (And no, I am not comparing myself to Modest Mouse. I'm trying to show how ridiculous your argument is).

And I will mention another comic whenever I feel like it. Fucker. If we are not allowed to mention an established comic without adding "which is great and better than anything ever produced by anyone so everyone who likes this comic is automatically my friend", then this isn't much of a "community". I prefer to think that people can have any opinion they want, and then we'll see what happens. Sluggy Freelance is strong enough to survive without people like you, Anonymous Adolf.

chuckcomics.com

Surlyben's picture

[quote:b2c402ba3f="Anonymous"]Assume what you like. I'm not playing twenty questions about my identity. The anonymity is so people will answer the message instead of attacking the messenger. You and william g still try and attack the person, though.

It's just kind of ironic that you are telling people not to complain while they are still anonymous nobodies, and yet, here you are, an anoymous nobody complaining about the complainers... The fact that you are acting like a troll doesn't really help your case much.

As for your message... I can't say that I agree. Webcomics are simple and easy. Just throw some sequential art up on the web, and you are good to go. Building an audience is harder, yes, but it ain't rocket science. Post new comics regularly, have good writing or at least make 'em laugh, and promote the thing here and there...

I'd go so far as to suggest that one place to promote your webcomic might be in forums of Comixpedia. As long as your post has substance beyond "check out my awesome comic, it will R0Xor your box0rz" most people won't care if you include a link your sig. Judging by the response this thread has received, I can't say that I see what the hell you are complaining about.

Also, I don't think Pete Abrams needs anyone to defend him from just getting started webcartoonists.

And another thing. Check out my awesome comic. It will RoX0r your boXorz. Even though I never update the damn thing.

-
Ben Bittner

scarfman's picture

[quote:835cbdc956="Surlyben"]As for your message... I can't say that I agree. Webcomics are simple and easy. Just throw some sequential art up on the web, and you are good to go.

See, now you've lost me. "Just throw some sequential art up on the web"?

[quote:835cbdc956="Surlyben"]Check out my awesome comic. It will RoX0r your boXorz. Even though I never update the damn thing.

Not as easy as you thought?

Surlyben's picture

Truth is that regular updates and 'building an audience' have never been a huge priority of mine. :)

-
Ben Bittner

[quote:393a91a119="Anonymous"] The anonymity is so people will answer the message instead of attacking the messenger. You and william g still try and attack the person, though.
Hypocrite, your message was delivered as an attack on someone. Any interest I along with some others, may have had in your "message" was lost.

Marine, quit posting on web forums under anoymous user names, its immature.

Katie Sekelsky's picture

Wow, I really hope someone just forgot to log in.

If not, the irony will kill me.

[quote:56e94b8cb6="Anonymous"]Marine, quit posting on web forums under anoymous user names, its immature.
If this is true, I can understand why he'd want to keep his ID a secret

scarfman's picture

[quote:88af02d3b8="scarfman"][quote:88af02d3b8="Surlyben"]Check out my awesome comic. It will RoX0r your boXorz. Even though I never update the damn thing.

Not as easy as you thought?

[quote:88af02d3b8="Surlyben"]Truth is that regular updates and 'building an audience' have never been a huge priority of mine.

Well, that's no foul. I think my point still stands, though, and speaks to the question that's the thread topic. If you're going to spend enough time on webcartooning that you question it, you have to be doing it because you love it and it won't let you go. That has to be enough because too often that's all that comes of your efforts. Matt Groening says, "Do it for love, because selling out is harder than you think." I'm not saying there's anything wrong with selling out, but if you don't love the work itself enough that the work itself alone will keep you at it, then go do something you do love, because that's what gets you through if you never get the chance to sell out.

Surlyben's picture

I don't disagree. I do my webcomic for love not money. I apologize if my post gave the wrong impression... Mainly I was just snarking at sock monkey... Also, kudos to you for bringing the thread back on topic. :mrgreen:

-
Ben Bittner

And Matt Groening never DID sell out, in any real way. The Tracy Ullman Show wanted to buy Life In Hell, but he said "No, I'll specifically make a cartoon that isn't as important to me, and you can use that." And he made The Simpsons, and (I think?) he's still drawing Life In Hell every week, even with millions of dollars rolling in from The Simpsons. So the people who liked Life In Hell better can still enjoy it, "untainted".

That's pretty respectable. He didn't have to do that.
chuckcomics.com

Yeah, except that Life in Hell has pretty steadily sucked for a while.

That's beside the point though. Point is, I like to draw, and the web is a good way for people to see what I draw. Being in college and being lazy I've never got the patience to draw enough coherent stuff to update regularly. Sometime, I will. Sometime. But as has been said already, make comics 'cause making comics is awesome.

I do my webcomic because if i didnt it'd bug the fuck outta me that i didnt do it in the first place. It's a talent and it should be used. There's a whole bunch of reasons really that i do it for. Sure i want it to be a success and hopefully live off it someday(I've no shame in admitting that's my goal), but i also do it because i like to tell stories in some way or another and what better way to tell a story than through art!

In any sense, I'm doing something right now that i love doing. It's better than thinking, "wish i could do it!" "I've not got the patience" and all that crap!! If you lack inspiration to do what you wanna do watch Fight Club the movie. It's all about doing something you love, rather than wanting to do something you love!

Wolfman

Odd that you mention fight club-- im watching it as I draw now.

== By the way--- I draw my comic so I can afford all the whores and cocaine.

Okay wait, drawing while watching Fight Club AND posting to message boards...? :? Maybe you know, if you do one thing at a time, that one thing would be absolutely genius! No go watch Fight Club and don't come back until you're ready to log in. :P

~Liriel

[quote:1a9daec854="Anonymous"]== By the way--- I draw my comic so I can afford all the whores and cocaine.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I don't make that kinda money from comics yet :cry:

Wolfman

bobweiner's picture

I create webcomics because I enjoy it. Period. It's my passion. Attracting new fans and getting money for my work are fringe benefits. I've invested six years into my work - and I've learned a LOT about many things, including: Photoshop, marketing, digital inking and coloring, web design, setting up forums and PHP, and most importantly - time management and commitment. Doing a webcomic has taught me a lot about myself, and for that reason alone - I'm grateful.

-K

Krishna M. Sadasivam Cartoonist, "The PC Weenies" http://www.pcweenies.net

I'd have to agree, doing my work has also taught me a lot about myself -- especially about how tenacious and detirmined I can be despite lack of sleep, food, air conditioning, etc. It's kinda like an aesthetic hermitage, in a way, all alone without creature comforts... getting closer to that creative oneness.

~Liriel