Skip to main content

The Cat Came Back: Cat Garza and the Highs and Lows of a Webcomic Pioneer

Few people have gone into the undiscovered country of the "infinite canvas" Scott McCloud spoke of in his book Reinventing Comics so boldly as has Cayetano Garza Jr.

Checkerboard Nightmare by Kristofer Straub, reviewed by Kelly J. Cooper

Checkerboard Nightmare (available at nightlightpress.com) is a mildly surreal humor comic written and drawn by Kristofer Straub and consistently presented three times a week (Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays).

Straub plays with meta-humor, poking fun at his main character's attempts at trying to create and popularize a web comic. But he also regularly nails other webcomics (and their own attempts at success), webcomic styles and clichés, webcomic readers, and the occasional faddish webcomic trend. Other issues like ethics, the law, and end user agreements manage to slide in o­n occasion as well.

Evolution Comics Takes the Plunge

Evolution Comics' second volume just hit the Internet. The online anthology of comics features new work from both upcoming and well-known artists, including the site's creators, Dan Carroll and Rachel Swift.

Carroll, who works for the University of Chicago Press in subscriptions, handles the main editorial duties. He also draws Mysterious Void. Swift, who's a site developer at the university, manages the web site itself. They both contributed to the latest volume of Evolution Comics, just recently released.

Evolution Comics' second volume just hit the Internet. The online anthology of comics features new work from both upcoming and well-known artists, including the site's creators, Dan Carroll and Rachel Swift. Carroll, who works for the University of Chicago Press in subscriptions, handles the main editorial duties. He also draws Mysterious Void. Swift, who's a site developer at the university, manages the web site itself. They both contributed to the latest volume of Evolution Comics, just recently released.

Bite Me! by Dylan Meconis

The overdone vampire genre has been explored so many times it's almost getting to the point where 'Blood Latte' might show up on the Starbucks menu to promote the new Anne Rice book. In order to stand out among bland competition, a vampire work must be created with its own... biting originality? (no more bad puns, promise.) Bite Me, by Dylan Meconis, is an online comic book that dares to break new ground by adding modern wit, toothy sarcasm (sorry), and a little gore to a genre that often takes itself way to seriously.

The 27th Letter

They look freakish. The noses are askew, the nostrils invisible. The eyes are beady little pinpricks, and the mouths have no lips, just parabolic cracks. They exist independent of anything else; they're just a few bits of black on endless white space.

Yet without the “emoticons,” the webcomics of today would be slower to recognize a fundamental human truth. We all recognize them – they look like typographic versions of the first faces any of us ever drew. And to understand their use, we have to go back in time to discover their prototype: the smiley-face.

Makeshift Musings and Comic Book Bliss: Transmetropolitan Town

I read some Transmetropolitan while on the streetcar this morning. It’s a great story about these people who’ve been revived from cryogenic sleep and suddenly realize that society has no place for people from the past -- just as they themselves can’t come to grips with the evolution that has happened around them. When it’s over, you feel the loneliness, confusion and heartache that grip these people. After I finished reading it, I looked at the people on the train and wondered how many of them could relate to that story.

Movie Comics

Movie Comics is about movies. More specifically, Movie Comics is about the rage you feel when a movie is disappointing or just plain sucks, when an actor turns in a lousy performance, when television is feeding the public particularly awful crap, or when a movie creator sells out his vision (this last is more generally known as "making a sequel").

February 2003

Cover Art by cat garza.

Why Comixpedia?

Because the WORLD is noticing that there is such a thing as a webcomic and is expressing a desire, a NEED for MORE.  Because webcomics ARE a viable art form, a new medium branching off from our print foremothers and fathers – a medium in which to expand, elaborate, experiment, and perhaps most importantly, enjoy.

Because there are now THOUSANDS of hobbyists, young and old, trying their hand at placing images in sequence, on an infinite canvas.

Publisher's Note

Comixpedia Yellow Mouse LogoWelcome to Comixpedia, your destination for news, interviews, reviews and articles about webcomics. We have worked hard to put together not only a tremendous first issue for you, but an infrastructure and staff that will ensure we keep bringing you quality issues. Our mission, simply stated, is to bring to your attention the best and the brightest of webcomics and in the process, promote this new art-form. We welcome your comments on our site and our coverage.