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ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

And now... the fourth annual People Of Webcomics list! I'll be the first to admit that this list gets harder and harder to compile as the lines between "webcomics" and just plain "comics" blurs harder than a greasy windshield in the middle of a West Texas downpour. Plus as publishing comics on the web and other digital formats becomes more commonplace it gets harder and harder to find those "firsts" that take comics in new directions whether artistic, technical or businesss-oriented.

Nevertheless webcomics still has a center of gravity distinct from comic books and newspaper comic strips. And the potential of webcomics remains unfettered. Webcomics remain well-positioned as a concept, as an attitude, as a means of distribution, as a medium and as an ethos to overcome any limitation previous forms of comics have imposed on themselves or been trapped in by the expectations of the general public.

As always let's stipulate right up front that most of you are going to disagree with some or most of the list. In listing 25 "people of webcomics" we attempt to highlight the people, who through art, innovation, business, or just plain presence have cast a big shadow on the webcomics landscape this year. We tried as much as possible to focus on 2007 which helps to explain why some otherwise very influential people are not on this year's list.

No matter why they're on the list, we think all of them, in their own ways, were just plain cool to watch this year. So without further fanfare, check out The POW List for 2007 (and be sure to heck out previous editions for comparison: the 2004 list; the 2005 list; and the 2006 list).

And now... the fourth annual People Of Webcomics list! I'll be the first to admit that this list gets harder and harder to compile as the lines between "webcomics" and just plain "comics" blurs harder than a greasy windshield in the middle of a West Texas downpour. Plus as publishing comics on the web and other digital formats becomes more commonplace it gets harder and harder to find those "firsts" that take comics in new directions whether artistic, technical or businesss-oriented.

Nevertheless webcomics still has a center of gravity distinct from comic books and newspaper comic strips. And the potential of webcomics remains unfettered. Webcomics remain well-positioned as a concept, as an attitude, as a means of distribution, as a medium and as an ethos to overcome any limitation previous forms of comics have imposed on themselves or been trapped in by the expectations of the general public.

As always let's stipulate right up front that most of you are going to disagree with some or most of the list. In listing 25 "people of webcomics" we attempt to highlight the people, who through art, innovation, business, or just plain presence have cast a big shadow on the webcomics landscape this year. We tried as much as possible to focus on 2007 which helps to explain why some otherwise very influential people are not on this year's list.

No matter why they're on the list, we think all of them, in their own ways, were just plain cool to watch this year. So without further fanfare, check out The POW List for 2007 (and be sure to heck out previous editions for comparison: the 2004 list; the 2005 list; and the 2006 list).

 

 


25. Tracey J. Butler

Tracey J. Butler was a big winner at the 2007 WCCAs taking home Best Newcomer, Best Artist, Best Character Rendering, and Best Anthropomorphic Comic for her webcomic Lackadaisy. She has continued to create new installments of the webcomic in 2007, furthering its tale of anthropomorphic cats at the Lackadaisy Speakeasy in the prohibition era of the United States.

One of the strong points of the comic is its artwork -- it features a washed-out sepia tone that works well with our preconceptions of the "twenties-era" setting.

This is Tracey J. Butler's first time on the POW List.

 

24. B. Shur

B. Shur won Outstanding Use of the Medium at the 2007 WCCAs for his webcomic I am a Rocket Builder. An inventive mix of traditional comic panels with animation, and other website-specific enviromental effects, this webcomic may be the first genuinely cohesive and entertaining "experimental" webcomic since Brambletown where the experimental aspects don't stand out as experimental (or overly showy).

This is B. Shur's first time on the POW List.

 

23. Josh Neufeld

A.D.: New Orleans After the Deluge, Josh Neufeld's account of the impact of Hurricane Katrina and the subsequent breaking of the levees in New Orleans is an absolutely engrossing snapshot of this tragic moment in recent American history. Neufeld explains that the comic is a true story with the dialogue taken from direct quotes, and the depictions taken from the real homes of the characters. Because this is a webcomic, Neufeld is easily able to post alongside the comic, research he conducted in assembling the story -- from audio and video clips to an entire library of links to additional information on New Orleans today.

This is Josh Neufeld's first time on the POW List.

 

22. Phil and Kaja Foglio

The Foglios won Outstanding Science Fiction webcomic at the 2007 WCCAs for their webcomic Girl Genius. They were also nominated (but did not win) for Best Digital Comic at the 2007 Eisner Awards. Although Girl Genius originated as a montly comic book, the Foglios were one of the first such established creators to fully transition from the monthly format to regular webcomic updates as their primary initial mode of publication.

This is Phil and Kaja Foglio's second time on the POW List (#5 on the 2005 POW List).

 

21. Jeph Jacques

Jeph Jacques won several awards at the 2007 WCCAs for his popular webcomic Questionable Content including Best Character Writing, Best Dramatic Writing, Best Romantic comic and Best Slice of life comic.

This is Jeph Jacques' second time on the POW List (#17 on the 2006 POW List).

 

20. Ryan Estrada

Ryan Estrada has been a presence in webcomics for a few years now - from his ironman extension of the 24 hour comic challenge to week-long marathons to his own multiple serialized comics to his video adventures in India, Mexico and beyond, Estrada has been one of the nicest and most supportive creators and collaborators in the "webcomics community". This year he took on the art duties for the popular poker-themed webcomic Life's a Bluff and coordinated a day of seemingly doing guest comics for almost every webcomic in existence.

There are times when webcomics doesn't seem as fun as it did in days gone by but Estrada is a guaranteed antidote to any thoughts of that.

This is Ryan Estrada's first time on the POW List.

 

19. Ryan North

This may be the first year in recent memory that Ryan North did not roll out a webcomic-related service such as Project Wonderful or OhNoRobot. Nevertheless he did continue to make upgrades and improvements to Project Wonderful, his auction-driven advertising service that seems to be used by just about every webcomic in existence.

And lest we forget -- North continued making his popular webcomic Dinosaur Comics which won Best Writer in the 2007 WCCAs.

This is Ryan North's third time on the POW List (#6 on the 2006 POW List, #15 on the 2005 POW List)

 

18. Kazu Kibuishi

In 2007, Kazu Kibuishi won Outstanding Layout and Outstanding Use of Color at the WCCAs for his webcomic Copper. Kibuishi is also the editor of the popular Flight anthology series which has featured many creators working in webcomics.

This is Kazu Kibuishi's fourth time on the POW List (#12 onthe 2006 POW LIst, #9 on the 2005 POW List, #7 on the 2004 POW List).

 

17. Tyler Martin

In 2007, Tyler Martin continued to work on his popular family-friendly webcomic Wally & Osborne, helped launch the all-ages webcomic collective Lunchbox Funnies, and developed additional versions of Comicpress, his webcomic-specific theme for the blogging software WordPress. Comicpress, in particular, really took off in 2007 with a number of well known webcomic sites, including most prominently PvP, switching over to using it.

In the spirit of full disclosure, let me add that Tyler Martin has done design work for ComixTalk but believe us when we write that had no influence on the decision to include him in this year's list.

This is Tyler Martin's first time on the POW List.

 

16. Jon Rosenberg

Two years ago, Jon Rosenberg turned his ambling humor webcomic Goats into a story-of-the-multiverse humor webcomic that seems to be wrapping up its massive storyline just this week. What can one say about Goats: it is a funny, rewarding read that has built a significant audience. Rosenberg has considerably improved his art over the years and with the recent two-year storyline proved he can maintain a much more sophisticated level of narrative work than he had previously attempted.

Rosenberg is also someone who conceivably could have been on this list in years past: he was one of the first webcomic creators to develop a successful merchandise business based on his webcomic, experimented with micropayments and helped to form one of the earliest and longest-running webcomic collectives, Dumbrella.

This is Jon Rosenberg's first time on the POW List.

 

15. Scott Kurtz, Kris Straub, Dave Kellett and Brad Guigar

All four of these creators came together to create a new "brand name" called Half Pixel. We wouldn't quite go so far as to call it a "super group" a la the Traveling Wilburys (although ELO fanatic Kris Straub would probably be besides himself if we did) but it certainly represents a stellar collection of established, veteran webcomic talent under one label.

Besides continuing to work on their various webcomic projects in 2007, collectively the four of them began a very informative podcast on webcomics and are in the midst of working on a book on webcomics, scheduled for publication in 2008.

This is Scott Kurtz's fourth time on the POW List (#2 on the 2006 POW List, #20 on the 2005 POW List, #1 on the 2004 POW List). This is Dave Kellet's second time on the POW List (#15 on the 2006 POW List). This is Brad Guigar's second time on the POW List (#4 on the 2005 POW List). This is Kris Straub's first time on the POW List.

 

14. Fred Gallagher

Fred Gallagher is the creator of Megatokyo which remains one of the most popular webcomics and continues to do well on the printed page in collections printed by CMX.

This is Fred Gallagher's third time on the POW List (#14 on the 2006 POW List, #19 on the 2004 POW List).

 

 

13. Tim Buckley

Tim Buckley is the creaor of the long-running and very popular Ctrl+Alt+Del and the animated spin-off CAD: The Animated Series. CAD is a webcomic about videogames and characters who like to play it. Buckley has been creating the webcomic for a number of years and has often been seen as charting a similar territory to Penny Arcade. Fair or not, CAD does deal with many of the same videogame industry topics as PA and employs an art style somewhat similar to the early work of PA artist Mike Krahulik. Nevertheless, CAD has developed much more of a continuity with its core cast of characters than PA and it was also one of the first webcomics to create an animated series based on it. Buckley has legions of fans who admire his work and with the vast numbers of videogame-focused webcomics out there today there are perhaps almost as many influenced by Buckley as by the work of Holkins and Krahulik.

This is Tim Buckley's first time on the POW List.

 

12. Steve Purcell

Steve Purcell is the creator of the long running characters Sam and Max. The characters were originally created by Purcell for a comic book, translated into an animated television show and a popular videogame, later revived in a new series of videogames and an accompanying webcomic. The two characters are private investigators and the webcomic revolves around their comedic adventures solving crime.

Sam and Max won Best Digital Comic at the 2007 Eisner awards. The webcomic does a wonderful job of conveying the spirit of the games. It offers a slight technical trick with the dialogue balloons and accompanying text appearing only on mouse-over of a panel (with the benefit of providing for an initial unblocked view of the artwork) but otherwise is a straight-forward multiple panel comic.

This is Steve Purcell's first time on the POW List.

 

11. Chris Onstad

The cult of Chris Onstad's Achewood continued to grow in 2007. Onstad won Outstanding Online Comic at this year's Ignatz awards (and did or did not show up in a gorilla suit to accept it.) and was named the Best Graphic Novel of the year by Time Magazine. Let's just run with Time's description of Achewood:

A bunch of cats, some robots, a bear and an otter who's 5 years old, live together in a fictional neighborhood called Achewood, which you might usefully think of as a grown-up, suburban, stoned version of Pooh's Hundred Acre Wood. The alpha and omega of Achewood are Ray Smuckles, a cat who's incredibly rich and successful at everything he does, but whom you can't quite hate because he enjoys it so much; and his best friend Roast Beef, who suffers from crippling depression. The art is at times crude, but it rises to moments of extreme lyrical beauty, and the writing has enormous emotional range — from aching sadness to some of the most brilliant, bizarre comedy happening anywhere, in any medium.

For more, check out the A.V. Club's interview with Onstad.

This is Chris Onstad's second time on the POW List (#8 on the 2006 POW List).

 

10. Mike Gold

Mike Gold, along with Brian Alvey and Glenn Hauman, started ComicMix in 2006, adding publication of original webcomic material in 2007. GOld has a long history in the comic book industry having previously worked at DC Comics, First Comics and Classics Illustrated. With work from many comic book veterans on the site, ComicMix has presented a fairly strong lineup of webcomics to date.

For more, check out this post at Occasional Superheroine.

This is Mike Gold's first time on the POW List.

 

9. Dan Buckley

Marvel turned out to be the first of the two big comic book publishers to put its universe of legacy content and characters on the web in a legal way. Marvel's Digital Comics Unlimited is a subscription site featuring a significant amount of material from Marvel's 60 year archives. It remains to be seen if this material will attract a significant audience on the web and what impact, if any, it will have on Marvel's traditional sales channel in Direct Market retail outlets. Still it's clearly one more sign that the web has won when you can now access the entire universe of Marvel continuity online.

Business-wise, Marvel's DCU is plowing through a subscription model many others have used before and for the most part discarded in favor of some form of free plus premium content. But Marvel comes to the web with a dedicated fan base so it'll be interesting to see if they find different results from forerunners such as Modern Tales.

For more, check out this CBR interview with Marvel President Dan Buckley.

This is Dan Buckley's first time on the POW List.

 

8. Ron Perazza and Kwanza Johnson

One of the biggest stories of the year was DC Comics launching of Zuda, a webcomics portal with original material. Headed up by Ron Perazza, DC Comics Director of Creative Services and Kwanza Johnson, DC Comics Online Editor, Zuda represents an interesting online strategy for the established monthly comic book publisher. With no content on Zuda from the existing library of DC work nor any new comics based on the existing universe of characters, Zuda instead has solicited new work from creators, primarily in the form of a contest. And so far Zuda has presented a wide range of work well outside the superhero genre DC is well known for.

Although the work-for-hire contracts that Zuda requires of creators for publication are controversial to some, most gave DC some credit for posting the contracts on the website for all to review ahead of time. Many creators were also interested in the fact that Zuda is offering to pay creators of the work it publishes a per-screen rate. Technically, Zuda imposed a 4 to 3 aspect ratio for work published on its site and uses a FLASH-based interface for viewing the comics on its site. Reviews have been mixed on both of these aspects of the site. But regardless of these issues, Zuda has presented some very good work in the webcomics published to date.

This is the first time on the POW List for Ron Perazza and Kwanza Johnson.

 

7. Matt Melvin, Kris Wilson, Dave McElfatrick and Rob Denbleyker

Melvin, Wilson, McEltatrick and Denbleyker are the creators of a webcomic called Cyanide and Happiness as well as the proprietors of the site that hosts it, explosm.net. Explosm.net has a large audience, seemingly right up there in numbers with Penny Arcade and xkcd. As a webcomic, C&H is pretty straightforward -- crude stick-figure art coupled with crude jokes. Sometimes fairly funny crude jokes but unsurprisingly consistently crude. And yet that probably explains a great deal of its success -- consistently delivering a particular type of comic. Moreover, the creators of C&H have been very aggressive in using social networking and other web 2.0 tools in getting their comic displayed all over the Internet (not just their own website).

For more, checkout our interview with Matt Melvin in this issue of ComixTalk.

This is the first time on the POW List for Matt Melvin, Kris Wilson, Dave McElfatrick and Rob Denbleyker.

 

6. Joey Manley and Josh Roberts

Both Joey Manley and Josh Roberts have been a presence in webcomics for sometime now. Joey Manley has had a hand in numerous projects over the years, starting with his podcast Talkaboutcomics to the Modern Tales subscription sites to the WebcomicsNation webcomic services site. Josh Roberts first created onlinecomics.net and more recently comicspace.com. This year Manley and Roberts announced a merger of their efforts and resources into a new company with outside investors. The new joint venture, named "Comicspace" -- with both Manley and Roberts at the helm -- should be an exciting venture to watch next year. Unlike other corporate ventures into the webcomic "space", Manley and Roberts have a history of working in partnership with independent creators.

For more, check out Tom Spurgeon's interview with both Manley and Roberts.

This is Joey Manley's fourth time on the POW List (#9 on the 2006 List, #2 on the 2005 POW List, #3 on the 2004 POW List) and Josh Roberts second time on the POW List (SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT MENTION: TECHNICAL CATEGORY on the 2006 List).

 

5. Rich Burlew

Rich Burlew is another long time creator and entrepreneur that arguably should have been on this list in years past. His webcomic The Order of the Stick is one of the most widely-read webcomics. In 2007, Burlew's webcomic TOOTS won the WCCAs for Best Long Form Comic and Best Gaming Comic. Another webcomic with stick-figure art, but Burlew successfully and affectionately parodies table-top gaming and other related activities to great effect in his webcomic.

Burlew also had a hand in launching one of the brightest new webcomics in 2007: Rob Balder's and Jamie Noguchi's Erfworld. Erfworld benefitted tremendously from being hosted on Burlew's website. Time named Erfworld the sixth best Graphic Novel of 2007.

This is Rich Burlew's first time on the POW List.

 

4. Scott Adams

Perhaps this ultimately is a wrong-headed choice, but it seems worth putting a marker down that 2007 was truly a year that walls between the different rooms of comics really came down in a big way. Scott Adams, the creator of the long-running syndicated newspaper comic strip Dilbert has always made use of technology in promoting and creating his webcomic. He was one of the first creators to put his email address into his printed comic (which led to fans peppering him with ideas for future comics) and more recently he has turned to blogging. Like all other newspaper comics, Dilbert is online, although it's the rare United States newspaper that doesn't carry Dilbert in print.

This is Scott Adams's first time on the POW List.

 

3. Jerry Holkins and Mike Krahulik

What do you say about the juggernaut that is Penny Arcade that hasn't been said before? One of the most read webcomics ever; multiple books now in print; PAX -- the largest convention for videogame enthusiasts; Child's Play -- a charity for children's hospitals; On the Rain-Slick Precipice of Darkness -- a videogame based on the webcomic. Heck both of them have even spawned little ones now (and not asexually!).

For more, check out this recent interview at CBR with Jerry Holkins (part 1 and part 2).

This is Jerry Holkins' and Mike Krahulik's fourth time on the POW List (#1 on the 2006 POW List, #1 on the 2005 POW List, #5 on the 2004 POW List)

 

2. Randall Munroe

There is no question that the biggest oversight of last year's People of Webcomics list was the omission of Randall Munroe, the creator of the webcomic xkcd. But by the end of 2007, there is absolutely no doubt about the explosion of interest in this incredibly smart and wistfully romantic comic. Sure it uses stick figure art, but like so many other well-written comics, the stick figure art seems to work well enough to deliver an entertaining and often insightful comic.

Let's start first with the numbers. Although tracking the relative audience sizes of various webcomics is a deeply imperfect art these days, it seems pretty clear that xkcd has the largest or very near the largest audience for a webcomic. All of which is more amazing when you consider the relatively recent start to the comic in 2006 which seems to refute the "accepted wisdom" of recent years that only webcomics started in the last century would ever become mega-popular. xkcd's audience growth was helped out by a number of "viral" comics that spread across the blog-o-sphere (helped by links from uber-sites like slashdot and boing boing) but it's consistently funny take on science, obsession and romance (albeit of a slightly nerd/geek variety) seems to have turned many of those visitors into repeat readers.

Numbers like this have allowed Munroe to mess with the very fabric of space and time on the Internet by positing websites and events in comics that his readership in turn has helped to turn from notion to reality. Probably the most prominent examples being this comic leading to an actual "wetriffs.com" and this comic leading to a spontaneous gathering of xkcd fans.

Although xkcd doesn't seem to have won many comic awards yet it was named the Best Comic in the 2007 Weblog Awards and has shown up on many blogs "best of" lists. For more, check out our interview with Randall Munroe which appeared in our March 2007 issue.

This is Randall Munroes' first time on the POW List.

 

1. Nicholas Gurewitch

There seems to be little doubt that this was a breakout year for The Perry Bible Fellowship. Nicholas Gurewitch took home Best Comic, Best Comedy Comic and Best Short Form Comic at the 2007 WCCAs; Best Online Comic at the Harveys. His book, The Trial of Colonel Sweeto, (published by Dark Horse) collecting strips from PBF, is one of the fastest-selling graphic novels on Amazon.com this year, with an initial print run of 36,000. Beyond simply garnering more attention from more corners of pop culture, Gurewitch continued to make brillantly simple and subversive comics under the PBF banner.

Having said all of that we can't pass up revisiting Gurewitch's part in perhaps the most memorable award ceremony of the year -- Gurewitch's presentation of the Ignatz award for Best Online Comic to Chris Onstad for his webcomic Achewood.

This is Nick Gurewitch's third time on the POW List (#3 on the 2006 Post List, #6 on the 2005 POW List).

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

WaterMedia's picture

I agree with many of these, which is odd. It is great to find that others respect the same creativity and passion that I'm in love with. XKCD reminds me why I do this...

Many thanks.

-Josh
www.WelcometoPixelton.com

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Also, Sohmer (and Blind Ferret) should be on the list because they are animating at least two of the comics that are on this list.

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

I fail to see how anybody could do more for webcomics than the PA guys. Randall Munrow has definitly done cool thing for his readers, and Gurewitch has had a good year for himself (be nice to see more frequent updates) And I'm glad they're getting recognized, but when 2 guys raise (what is it now...) a million dollars for a chairity they started through their webcomic, how are they not #1. Maybe people are just tired of seeing them dominate the list year after year.

I also anticipate Halfpixel being higher on the list next yera after they release their book.

Does it hurt your score if you are a group instead of an individual?

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Look, I know it might seem that Ryan is only acting slighted for his exclusion, but seriously this list is totally flawed and lacking of logic.

I can see including Marvel and Zuda since they shook up things with controversy maybe. But then shouldn't Platinum be on here too somewhere? Especially considering the success of Hero by Night.

You seem to have Megatokyo and CAD on here for Arbitrary reasons. And if CAD starting an animated series is a reason, why isn't Blind Ferrett on here for spearheading 2 existing and 2 in the works animated series based on webcomics?

Steve Purcells webcomic work consists of making ads for a video game. His Eisner acceptance speech was something like "Gee, I guess I better start learning about these Webcomics." Why is he higher on the list than Phil and Kaja who reworked their entire model and saved their comic with the web?

It's not that the list has no meaning. It's not that people are upset with if or where they landed on it. It's just that the list, this year, seems to be thrown together at the last minute with no real thought or research.

Whomever wrote this has his finger miles away from the pulse of webcomics.

P.S. What about Rich Stevens? Didn't he get syndicated in 2007? Christ.

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

It's just that this list has no real meaning for why people are in the spot they are or even on the list.

It seems closer to a basic list of people who are slightly named in the webcomic world with a small bio and if that's the case then why use numbers and asign rank?

 

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Greg Carter's picture

Here's a surprise. People are hatin' because they don't agree with someone's opinion. This is why there's no "webcomic community" - because it's based on the internet.

FAIL!

As to the list... I've never heard of most of those people and don't like most of the comics. But it doesn't bother me that this list wouldn't match mine.

Greg Carter Abandon

Greg Carter - Abandon: First Vampire - Online Graphic Novel

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Erg's picture

I tend to think the list would be a joke if it ignored guys like Fred Gallagher for people who maybe have done something that seems exciting now but by next year isn't even on the web. When you make a list about presence and influence size and longevity do matter. I haven't read megatokyo since Gallagher became writer/artist instead of just artist, but his manga sales and numbers, and the rip offs that pour onto drunk duck, webcomicsnation and comicsgenesis everyday are a testament to his continued influence.

Steve Purcell seems like he should be higher up though. He won that as a legacy for the Sam and Max comics he wrote in the late eighties and early nineties more than this short thing. Or so is my opinion.

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Black_Kitty's picture

If this was a list about the 25 most influencial people in webcomics of no particular time, then I can see your point. However, this is a list about 25 people who "through art, innovation, business, or just plain presence have cast a big shadow on the webcomics landscape this year."

As ComixTalk presents itself as somewhat of a webcomic news hub, then it wouldn't be unreasonable to look at this from a news point of view. Was there any news about Fred Gallagher in 2007 that really shook the webcomic community? Did Fred Gallagher do anything, whether it be through his art, innovation, business, or just being there that have created a change in the webcomic landscape?

If this is People of Webcomics List for 2007 then it should be about people who have done something significant in 2007. If just plain updating your webcomic and keep doing what you've been doing since last year is enough to make a dent in the webcomic landscape, then we're either a very boring bunch or we're missing a few more people. Namely all the other popular webcomics out there who have also been updating their webcomic during 2007.

I do agree that DJ Coffman should be there as well as Platinum Studios (although who knows, maybe I'm bias.)

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

jhorsley3's picture

I agree and disagree with you. Fred deserves his credit, but has he done anything noteworthy this year? If this is a list about 2007 it should pertain to what has happened in 2007.

~ jhorsley3

Web-Comic - http://jhorsley3.com/y2cl

Blog - http://jhorsley3/rcoa

~ jhorsley3

Web-Comic - http://y2clcomic.com

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Black_Kitty's picture

In listing 25 "people of webcomics" we attempt to highlight the people, who through art, innovation, business, or just plain presence have cast a big shadow on the webcomics landscape this year.

If the above is the standard for making it to the list, then there are a few people I disagree with. It's not an offense to them but I fail to see how winning awards or continuing to update means that you've "cast a big shadow on the webcomics landscape this year."

If that is the case, then one doesn't need to think about a list. Just copy and paste the list at WCCA.

I'm not trying to devalue the awards these people won (or in MT's case, it just maintaining its existance) but I would have much rather see people who have done something that really did cause a change. Winning an award does not always necessarily mean you've sparked a change in the landscape.

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Coffman's picture

Sohmer for President!

DJ Coffman- cartoonist

yirmumah.net - herobynight.com

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Ryan Sohmer's picture

I guess I best be working on a platform to run on...

 

The use of coarse language in a political campaign, yay or nay?

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

jhorsley3's picture

the coarser the better I would presume.

~ jhorsley3

Web-Comic - http://jhorsley3.com/y2cl

Blog - http://jhorsley3/rcoa

~ jhorsley3

Web-Comic - http://y2clcomic.com

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Coffman's picture

HELL YAY!

DJ Coffman- cartoonist

yirmumah.net - herobynight.com

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Sohmer should be up there, if not number one.

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Such an utterly pointless, asinine list. The ranking seems mostly arbitrary and the requirements to be on the list if the author didn't really have any accomplishments past "continued to update and get teh gud hits" were winning WCCAS, an award whose value is dubious at best. Any list where Tim Buckley is listed simply for being Tim Buckley is worthless.

C'mon Comixtalk, you can (probably) do better than this. Drop the pretense that the ranking has meaning and split the list into two: A list of creators' comics you liked in 2007 and a list of people who actually did stuff in 2007.

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Just because you're not on it, Sohmer, doesn't make it useless.

That being said, you belong on there instead of Fred from MT. Seriously.

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Ryan Sohmer's picture

Useless list.

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

jhorsley3's picture

IT does let your read about 25 people making webcomics...

if thats any consolation...

~ jhorsley3

Web-Comic - http://jhorsley3.com/y2cl

Blog - http://jhorsley3/rcoa

~ jhorsley3

Web-Comic - http://y2clcomic.com

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

David Simon's picture

Why didn't Aaron Diaz make it to the list? The man's bound for global domination!

Crimson Dark

[url=http://www.davidcsimon.com/crimsondark/]Crimson Dark[/url]

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Ninja-bot's picture

Steve Purcell is made of pure WIN. With the success of Sam and Max combined with the fact that the new episodic games based on the characters is the ONLY episodic game that *works* and updates in an "episodic" manner (Lookin at you Half Life and Sin Episodes) one would think he'd rank a bit higher on the list.

Also, gotta second Tom's comment above. Simply being big and popular doesn't seem like a great reason to be on a "People Of..." list. Perhaps shrink it to a top 10-15 and highlight the creators and those involved who actually further and innovate an industry the is filled with opporunities to do so.


 

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"I'm a Ninja-bot. In that order." -Ronin


Shuriken Diaries - Updated Mondays and Thursdays
"I'm a Ninja-bot. In that order." -Ronin

Re: ComixTalk's People Of Webcomics List For 2007

Not to slight Fred Gallagher or his success with Megatoyko, but you're reasons for including him on this list aren't very strong. You credit his comic for being popular and for his books continuing to sell well.

Basically you're rewarding him for maintaining the status quo.

I would have hoped the list be a little bit more progressive than that.