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Eisner Digital Comics Controversy?

T Campbell hits on something we talked about in the comments to our earlier Eisner post this week: what exactly is Matt Forsythe's ojingogo nominated for?  As in what did Forsythe do in 2005 to receive the nomination.

ojingogo was nominated in 2005, presumably for work up to the end of 2004 (which T seems to confirm in his post which includes a discussion of the rules).  I calculated 9 new pages since then, T calculates only 7 new pages.  Either way ojingogo is a fairly short piece which is still unfinished.  It seems unfair, and a mite bit ridiculous with the now vast amount of material on the web to twice nominate a short unfinished work for the Eisner award.

All of which seems like I am condemning Forsythe's work I suppose, but I am not and when it's finished I would have no problems with its nomination.  Nominating an unfinished work on the web for an award is problematic and should not be allowed.  This rule would not discriminate against long-form or ongoing serialized webcomics if we allowed for the judges to nominate technically unfinished webcomics on the basis of finished chapters or storylines.  And in any event, the judges should be clear about the work that is the basis for their nomination.

An award you say?

Uncle Ghastly's picture

Science has yet to invent an instrument capable of measuring my interest in any award I have no chance in hell of ever winning.

Re: An award you say?

EricMillikin's picture

[quote=Ghastly]Science has yet to invent an instrument capable of measuring my interest in any award I have no chance in hell of ever winning.[/quote]

I've got a similar attitude, which is why I pretty much only follow the Nobel Peace Prize, America's Most Wanted, and the AVN Awards.

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Fetus-X is the greatest comic in the world.

European Footballer of the Year

Greg Carter's picture

I have a better chance at a Golden Boot than I do a comic award. Oddly enough, I like it that way. No pressure.

Greg Carter
Abandon
UpDown Studio

Greg Carter - Abandon: First Vampire - Online Graphic Novel

Submission info?

Greg Carter's picture

I probably missed a link above, Google failed me. Where can we get info for submitting for next year's Eisners? And what else is out there? Someone said Harvey's?

All info will be greatly appreciated.

Greg Carter
Abandon
UpDown Studio

Greg Carter - Abandon: First Vampire - Online Graphic Novel

You'll have to wait until

You'll have to wait until the call for entries next year to submit for the Eisners. I believe it's usually announced on comic-con.org. The 2006 call for submissions is here, which includes the address, instructions, and contact info.

The Harveys (named after Harvey Kurtzman, the mind behind the original Mad), are nominated by and voted on by comics pros. They're currently given out at the Baltimore Comic-Con. AFAICT, you don't submit your own work. You also have to give a summary of your work in comics on your ballot.

The Ignatz Awards are a festival award at Small Press Expo. The submissions are vetted by an anonymous jury, and the resulting 5 nominations per category are voted on by SPX attendees (which includes both pros and the general public). The guidelines are here

Thanks! I know some folks

Greg Carter's picture

Thanks! I know some folks who are interested. I'll point them to comic-con.org to follow the news.

I don't mind self-promoting the hell out of myself, but applying for an award seems kinda weird to me. Not that there's anything wrong with that, of course.

Greg Carter
Abandon
UpDown Studio

Greg Carter - Abandon: First Vampire - Online Graphic Novel

Rather...

[quote]Nominating an unfinished work on the web for an award is problematic and should not be allowed[/quote]
Ah ... but then who would you have to nominate? Webcomics by their very nature are works in progress. Isn't that part of the magic? Both readers and creators are treated to a totally different and immersive experience, then say your standard print/newsprint comic. You're allowed to view pages as they are created and interact (in varying degrees depending upon the comic) with the creators, asking their intent or their direction.

Personally, I think this years rules we stated poorly, but were created in order to consider webcomics that were worked on in 2005 and not old comics laying about that were posted online for the express purpose of being nominated.

Rather... I'd suggest the 2006 criteria encompass a more direct set of guide lines. That being that the webcomic creator have a block of content created in the year in question and be at least X number of pages in length. Something like 20-50 pages of new content at least. It doesn't have to be a large number of pages, but I really don't think that a comic that has 2-3 hours of work put into it over the span of an entire year has the merit to even be considered.

Also I think it's unfair to assume that only a very few webcomic creators submitted there work. I've heard many already comment that they, indeed did. I know that I myself submitted my little comic.

That being said though...

There is quite a bit of difference between submitting a thing and actually having a thing looked at.

Warmest regards,
C.Brudlos
Alpha Shade
http://www.alpha-shade.com

Eric Millikin

Erik Melander's picture

Some intresting points and discussion can be found in Eric Millikin's livejournal
http://users.livejournal.com/_eric_m_/357527.html

It would have been more interesting if...

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

Eric's certainly entitled to his opinion even if he feels the need to tweak me in doing so.  (Note to Eric: of course the bunny site is old, notice the "new to me" preface to the post.).

Look, Steven Spielberg might make the most brilliant 10 minute reel of a film ever but he doesn't get an award until he finishes the damn film.  On the other hand the Academy gives awards to short finished films every year in the categories of Best Animated Short Film, Best Live Action Short Film and Best Documentary Short Subject. 

I don't see Eric actually debating this point at all.  Instead Eric seems to be mingling the idea of length with the notion of "finished work" in his comment -- it's pretty obvious if you think about it that there's a huge difference between criticizing the length of something versus criticizing the Eisners for nominating an unfinished work.  There's a lot of short finished works that might be worthy of Eisner nominations.

I do agree with Eric though that it's obvious that webcomic creators need some independent "book" cred to get attention from the Eisners - one can see that from what's been nominated.  Understanding why things have worked the way they have is fine but not really an answer to a point about how things should work. 

____

Xaviar Xerexes 

I am a Modern Major Generality.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

I think Eric Millikin's post was wonderful

EricMillikin's picture

[quote=xerexes]... Eric seems to be mingling the idea of length with the notion of "finished work" in his comment -- it's pretty obvious if you think about it that there's a huge difference between criticizing the length of something versus criticizing the Eisners for nominating an unfinished work.[/quote]

The reason I address both the length of ojingogo as well as it's ongoing nature is that T. Campbell believes "it is the two factors IN COMBO, the shortness and the incompleteness" that ought to disqualify it. That is why I talk about "The length of a story or an installment of a story" in about the fifth sentence of my post, as well as numerous times throughout the comments. For example, "[Some] seem to believe that shortish, ongoing webcomics should not be eligible for Eisner nominations. I don't think that either the length of a story or the fact that it is 'to be continued' necessarily harm its potential as an award-winning artistic work, and given the Eisner's history of honoring "Best Short Story" and "Best Continuing Series" in print comics, I'm not at all surprised that they nominated a very good continuing, shortish webcomic for an award."

Also, I know that you know that the bunnies animations are old. That wasn't the point. The point was that you didn't know about those old bunny animations until they were already old. Get with the times, man.

--------------------------

Fetus-X is the greatest comic in the world.

The bunnies, they are on fire!

Fabricari's picture

"Also, I know that you know that the bunnies animations are old. That wasn't the point. The point was that you didn't know about those old bunny animations until they were already old. Get with the times, man."

I want this to be stored in whatever Internet time-capsule they're preparing for 2006. Seriously, read that out of context a few times. It's a riot! And it needs to be recited by Ben Stiller, like this.

 

Fabricari - Sexy Robots and Violent Cyberpunk Comics

Steve "Fabricari" Harrison

should a distinction be made

oolong's picture

should a distinction be made between, say, a 30 page run of a 64 page story, and a serial that's been ongoing for 30 pages that intends to go on indefinitely?

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Finished Or Not

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

I don't think the length is important - the question is whether it's finished or not.  For an ongoing serial  - like PvP or Sluggy or whatever, one can look at "chapters" or a "storyline" or a "season".  I think that's a reasonable way to deal with that type of strip. (It's not that different than tv - most American tv series are written as if they will go on forever so awards are given on individual shows or for seasons)

 

____

Xaviar Xerexes 

I am a Modern Major Generality.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Eisner Digital Comics Controversy?

comicbase.nl's picture

What if the work is excellent? Does that make any difference for this 'rule'? I think qualitative work should be nominated, not 'quantitative' work.

COMICBASE.NL

[url=http://www.comicbase.nl]COMICBASE.NL[/url]

No one's actually arguing

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

No one's actually arguing for quantity - at least I'm certainly not.  It's a question of whether or not we should be nominating work that is unfinished.  Hopefully all of the nominations are based on the excellence of the work in question.

I suppose I also highlighted the short amount of additional material added to the nominated work because I was trying to figure out what exactly was the content that was the basis of this year's nomination.  I think part of the problem is the way the Eisner's have approached the temporal aspect of deciding which webcomics are eligible for which year's awards.

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Xaviar Xerexes 

I am a Modern Major Generality.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

I agree with Mr. Fabricari -

Greg Carter's picture

I agree with Mr. Fabricari - I'm glad they are making an effort and since they have their heads up their printland, it will take a while to get it close to right. At least PVP I've heard of, even though I don't read it. Where the hell did they dig up the other three?

Greg Carter
Abandon
UpDown Studio

Greg Carter - Abandon: First Vampire - Online Graphic Novel

Greg

The William G's picture

It's called "These guys submitted their work when the call went out, and no one else did"

Not to say these comics suck, they're good. But you know, it's a big web.

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The William G - Romantic Drama, Post-Apocalyptic Monsters, and More Comic Experimentation


Thanks! I was too lazy to

Greg Carter's picture

Thanks! I was too lazy to look it up. ;)

In that case, as more people know about it, the submissions will get better. Like I said, I think the category is gonna grow - painfully and slowly, but it will get better eventually.

Greg Carter
Abandon
UpDown Studio

Greg Carter - Abandon: First Vampire - Online Graphic Novel

I believe that one of the

Joey Manley's picture

I believe that one of the concerns they had all along, about whether or not to have a webcomics category, was that it's extremely difficult for the judges to know when something was "published," as opposed to the print world, where publication dates are well-known. Generally, the judges are not as well-versed in the webcomics world as some of the people from this community are. And, let's face it, even the most well-versed person in webcomics would have a hard time with that particular question. I'm probably pretty familiar with the whole field (not the biggest expert, but more familiar than many), and I'd never heard of ojingogo outside of the context of the Eisner Awards. (It does look like a cool webcomic, he hastened to add ...).

I'm glad there's a digital comics category in the Eisners, but I don't expect much from any awards platform. My illusions about awards ceremonies were shattered when Annie Hall beat Star Wars for best motion picture way back when (grin).

I'm even more glad that Eisner judges continue to give nods to webcomics creators in other categories (this was one of my fears when the digital comics category got announced -- that it would be a convenient ghetto -- but that hasn't happened). For example, Ursula Vernon's "talent deserving of wider recognition" award this year is well-deserved and very exciting.

I predict PvP will win in the digital comics category this year, based on the reality that the Eisner voters (as opposed to the Eisner judges) are overwhelmingly comprised of comic book retailers, who will be more familiar with PvP because of its Direct Market presence as an Image comic book.

They're all deserving, though. They really are. And lots more besides.

Joey
www.webcomicsnation.com

Eisner voting

Actually Eisner voters are not "overwelmingly comprised of comic book retailers." Less than 10 percent of ballots come from retailers. The vast majority are from comic book professionals: writers, artists, editors, and publishers.

When the 2005 judges agreed to add the digital category, Steve Conley (whose "Astounding Space Thrills" was one of the first and longest-running webcomics) came up with the basic rules. The Eisners are first and foremost awards for comic books and graphic novels. The Eisners only rarely include nominees for works that would more normally be thought of as "comic strips," the exceptions being in the Archival category (for collections of infulential strips) and the Writer/Artist-humor category for folks like Tony Millionaire ("Maakies" collections). So the first requirement was that the digital comics/webcomics category would be for works that more closely resemble comic book work as opposed to comic strip work (thus the requirement of "long form"). The second requirement was for the work to be professional-level, which is a difficult requirement to spell out and ended up being defined by having to have a unique URL or being part of a webcomics community. (The full rules can be found at http://www.comic-con.org/cci/cci_eisners06call.shtml ).

Creating this category has put a huge burden on the Eisner judges. In addition to having to read the majority of output of comics and graphic novels for the year, they are now expected to read the deluge of webcomics submissions. I help them somewhat by screening out things that obviously aren't eligible (daily gag strips, for instance, or strips that are part of blogs), but they still face a formidable task of going to websites, having to track down beginnings of storylines among navigational mazes, and more.

To be nominated, works have to really stand out--and stand up in comparision to the print works that the judges are also looking at. They also have to SUBMITTED in the first place, and in skimming through some of the strips mentioned in this thread, I'm seeing plenty of titles that I don't recognize.

Because many webcomics don't have dates on them, we also have to rely on the cartoonist or submitter for eligibility. In the case of ojingogo, it qualifies for 2005 since upon investigation we found that the majority of the series was indeed posted in 2005. (And completion is not really an issue; the rules don't say stories must be "completed": in the regular Eisners, a limited series, for instance, doesn't need to be completed--but at least half of it has to have been published during the year of eligibility.) The judges were obviously impressed enough with the storytelling and cartooning in that particular webcomic to give it high enough scores to make it on the ballot. And remember--the judges are different every year; it was a different set of judges who chose it last year.

The judges do indeed look at webcomics creators in the other categories. Before the digital category was added, Justine Shaw was nominated in two categories--because she sent in printouts of her work for the judges to see, and they loved it.

The digital/webcomics category will evolve as webcomics evolve. And because each year's Eisner judges can add or drop catories, it could even disappear if the judges don't think the work submitted is of high-enough quality to justify its includsion in a particular year (that has happened with other categories; this year they dropped Best Humor Publication).

Again, we are looking for professional-level work--the Kyle Bakers, Frank Espinosas, Andy Runtons, Jessica Abels, or Eric Powells of the web. The Oscars don't have an "amateur films" category. Instead, all sorts of film festivals exist for aspiring moviemakers. Similarly, I understand that the webcomics community has awards programs of its own to help draw attention to the better work. And with something like 5000 or more webcomics out there right now, that's certainly a useful goal.

I welcome suggestions for refining the submissions guidelines for the Eisners webcomics category that will make it easier for creators to know what is eligible and for the judges to have better-defined criteria.

Jackie Estrada
Eisner Awards Administrator
jackiee@mindspring.com

Thanks for commenting here.

Xaviar Xerexes's picture

Thanks for commenting here.  I just wanted to say that I think most folks are very happy that the Eisners added the Digital Comics category and I myself am pleased when webcomics and their creators also get recognized in the other Eisner award categories. 

[quote=JackieEstrada]When the 2005 judges agreed to add the digital category, Steve Conley (whose "Astounding Space Thrills" was one of the first and longest-running webcomics) came up with the basic rules.[/quote]

I will have to find Steve at Murky Coffee and talk to him about it.  I definitely understand how the web presents some novel questions on how to decide what's eligible for an award.  The webcomic-centric award (Cartoonists' Choice Awards) has had similar issues over what is eligible each year. 

[quote=JackieEstrada]The Eisners are first and foremost awards for comic books and graphic novels. The Eisners only rarely include nominees for works that would more normally be thought of as "comic strips," the exceptions being in the Archival category (for collections of influential strips) and the Writer/Artist-humor category for folks like Tony Millionaire ("Maakies" collections). So the first requirement was that the digital comics/webcomics category would be for works that more closely resemble comic book work as opposed to comic strip work (thus the requirement of "long form").[/quote]

I'm actually confused a bit by this.  I understand the history of the Eisners and so I see in part what you mean but in your mind do comic books = superheroes and comic strips = jokes or is it just the format they're published in?  PVP which is one of the nominees is both a webcomic and a comic book, but in terms of Scott Kurtz's subject matter and how he formats his comic - PVP would be right at home on the comic strip pages of any newspaper.

[quote=JackieEstrada]Creating this category has put a huge burden on the Eisner judges. In addition to having to read the majority of output of comics and graphic novels for the year, they are now expected to read the deluge of webcomics submissions. I help them somewhat by screening out things that obviously aren't eligible (daily gag strips, for instance, or strips that are part of blogs), but they still face a formidable task of going to websites, having to track down beginnings of storylines among navigational mazes, and more.

To be nominated, works have to really stand out--and stand up in comparision to the print works that the judges are also looking at.

They also have to SUBMITTED in the first place, and in skimming through some of the strips mentioned in this thread, I'm seeing plenty of titles that I don't recognize. Because many webcomics don't have dates on them, we also have to rely on the cartoonist or submitter for eligibility.[/quote]

This I understand, although I suspect you'll get more submissions next year.  It's just taking time for webcomics creators to understand how many of these existing comics institutions, like the Eisners, work.

[quote=JackieEstrada]In the case of ojingogo, it qualifies for 2005 since upon investigation we found that the majority of the series was indeed posted in 2005. (And completion is not really an issue; the rules don't say stories must be "completed": in the regular Eisners, a limited series, for instance, doesn't need to be completed--but at least half of it has to have been published during the year of eligibility.)[/quote]

I understand that's the current rule - I was stating my opinion about what I think should be the rule for webcomics.  Webcomics presents an issue not really present with print material.  When you say "a limited series, for instance, doesn't need to be completed--but at least  half of it has to have been published during the year of eligibility" well that's hard to translate to webcomics.  Unlike books which get printed and presumably distributed, webcomics just get posted.  So while each book is a definite amount of material, webcomics are often posted in much smaller and more frequent amounts.  Creators don't necessarily treat an individual "post" in the same way creators treat an individual book in a limited series.

Webcomics also don't lend themselves well to the rul that at least half of it has to be published during the year of eligibility rule because webcomic creators are not always 100% of the length of the final material.  There's nothing wrong with that - webcomics don't have to pay for paper, ink, etc so they should take up as much space as the creator decides in the end is necessary for the story.  But it does mean that it's difficult to say ahead of time how long a webcomic will actually be when completed.

[quote=JackieEstrada]I welcome suggestions for refining the submissions guidelines for the Eisners webcomics category that will make it easier for creators to know what is eligible and for the judges to have better-defined criteria.

Jackie Estrada Eisner Awards Administrator jackiee@mindspring.com[/quote]

That's great - thanks for the kind offer.  I'm not entirely convinced in my mind yet if there's a "right answer" to any of this but I hope we can offer some constructive comments to you.

 

____

Xaviar Xerexes 

I am a Modern Major Generality.

I run this place! Tip the piano player on the way out.

Print collections?

I couldn't help but notice the mention of the Archival-Comic Strips category for collections of strips. Would printed collections of online comics qualify for this category, or is it only for classic newspaper strips like Peanuts and Krazy Kat?

Archival collections refers

Archival collections refers to collections of material that is at least 15 years old.

We do have the category "Graphic Album--Reprint," which applies to newer material that has appeared in some other form before being collected into a book.

Jackie Estrada

I usually don't give a damn

apfurtado's picture

I usually don't give a damn about this stuff but this years nominees in the Digital Comics category left me a little empty. I was just waiting for someone else to make a comment. I agree that just having the category is a huge plus, and I also think that the comics nominated, although not my favorites, are very well done. There are just so many more comics out there on the web that update more frequently, and are just all together much better in story and art.
I'm in agreement with Fabricari, which I thought was a refreshing post, BTW.) Here are a few comics I think deserve more recognition.

PandaXpress
Pewfell
Atland
Gunnerkrigg Court
And because I'm a complete shameless, self-promoter...Elf `n Troll

But in all seriousness, I think the first 4 links are outstanding comics with good writing and art and are also updated regularly with more than one page per month. I'm sure that if i spent another 5 minutes on this, I could come up with a whole lot more.

Again, I don't completely begrudge the current nominees and it usually all just boils down to your own particular tastes but, I just feel there's a much better representation out there.

Just out of curiosity, did

Just out of curiosity, did you actually submit Elf 'n Troll for consideration? The Eisner judges don't go on fishing expeditions for comics, they nominate from what has been submitted to them by publishers and creators (this is true of their print categories as well as the digital category).

Quote:Just out of curiosity,

apfurtado's picture

[quote]Just out of curiosity, did you actually submit Elf 'n Troll for consideration? The Eisner judges don't go on fishing expeditions for comics, they nominate from what has been submitted to them by publishers and creators (this is true of their print categories as well as the digital category).[/quote]

No, I did not. I only included my comic in the comment to be a smart ass and as stated, a shameless plug. :)
Maybe next year.

Self-nomination?

Fabricari's picture

Before this, I've never heard of people self-nominating their comics. It just seems... tacky. Granted, there's the whole, "no one will do it if you don't" train of thought. In this light, I would wager that the digital strip category gets 10 times the number of applicants for nomination next year. And yes, I'll be sending mine in... apparently.

Ironically, I just received, in the mail, a nomination form for the Russ Manning Promising Newcomer Award. Should I be penciling in Fabricari?


Fabricari - Sexy Robots and Violent Cyberpunk Comics

Steve "Fabricari" Harrison

Technically, the publisher

Technically, the publisher is supposed to be the one to submit. Creators may submit their own work if they believe that their publisher would not submit (e.g. the publisher does not submit works at all, or the creator recently took a job at another company). If you are your own publisher, the distinction is moot.

"Digital"?

Neil Cohn's picture

The thing that has always gotten me about the Eisner's "Digital Comics" category, is that (while all great works) the nominations seem consistently to have nothing special about them "digitally."

Most maintain a standard print-derived structure (strip or single page) with the biggest layout modification being a long scroll. And, at most they seem to only have been colored digitally from hand-drawn-and-scanned line art. No dramatic Infinite Canvases, very little major digital-only coloring effects. Where's the uniquely digital works?

Does anyone else feel that this is either extremely timid or just uneducated on the part of the nominating committee? It basicallly reduces the whole category to just a method of digital distribution.

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Studying the Visual Language of "Comics" - www.emaki.net

------- Studying the Visual Language of "Comics" - http://www.emaki.net

I think you're just reading

Gordon McAlpin's picture

I think you're just reading into the term "digital," here, Neil. Anything on the internet is digital, by virtue of just being on the internet. These trappings you mentioned: scrolling or infinite canvas, coloring effects, these aren't what they're talking about with the term, so whether or not they take advantage of these possibilities is irrelevant.

It's just comics on the internet, which IS what webcomics is, in its broadest sense.

By calling it "digital comics," they leave it open to any future developments, like, I dunno. DVD-ROM Comics or some shit. I dunno. I'm not psychic.

The point is, I think they're trying to be broad and MORE inclusive, not reductive.

Multiplex is a twice weekly humor comic about the staff of the Multiplex 10 Cinemas and the movies that play there.

Perhaps

Neil Cohn's picture

I can understand the expansive aspect that you bring up, but at the same time, my personal opinion is that what makes digital comics interesting is that they allow for certain things that print doesn't as much. So, why not honor those developments that could only happen on the web?

If it's just about format, the shifting landscape of the web and its relation to print create some odd concerns. For instance, last year's Eisner winner in this category was "Mom's Cancer" — a piece well deserving of honors. However, after it won it was printed into a book, and is no longer available on the web. So, now you have a winner of "Best Digital Comic" that is no longer "digital" in any way whatsoever (it's also basically just scanned line art).

Doesn't this strike you as odd somehow, or am I just being nitpicky?

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Studying the Visual Language of "Comics" - www.emaki.net

------- Studying the Visual Language of "Comics" - http://www.emaki.net

It's a valid nitpick. How's

Gordon McAlpin's picture

It's a valid nitpick. How's that?

Me, I don't think it's odd at all, to be honest. I think it SHOULD just be about format.

I think awards for the things you mentioned before are (arguably) too specific and would be better served by a webcomics-centric awards program -- which is to say, not the Eisners. For the Eisners, I think one award for Best Digital Comic is sufficient -- like the Oscar's Short Film categories.

Multiplex is a weekly webcomic revolving around the staff of the Multiplex 10 Cinemas.

Multiplex is a twice weekly humor comic about the staff of the Multiplex 10 Cinemas and the movies that play there.

i don't understand why

oolong's picture

i don't understand why ojingogo was nominated in the first place, ONCE, finished or not. it's not actually... good.

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Sure it

Sure it is!

_____________

Kiwis by beat!

<a xhref="http://www.kiwisbybeat.com" target=blank>Kiwis by beat!</a>

Awards Add Awareness

Fabricari's picture

While no award goes with out controversy or drama, I'm still happy to see a Digital Comic category. It's going to be several years until they get it right though. The truth is, "digital comics" is far too narrow of a category. I would wager there are more webcomics than print comics. Or does Will Eisner's heralding of comics as liturature apply to webcomics as well?

While casually reading webcomics for the last 6 years or so, I've only really scrutinized it in the last year. I can't tell you how amazed I am at the diversity and talent. I find the "weaker" nominations to be a bit of a surprise.

As we do address these discrepancies, lets try to do it in a way that keeps it positive and promotes webcomics. Let's make it a practice of pointing out other great webcomics every time we address this? At least, embedded in negativity, folks who are new to webcomics will be given a lot of options. Even if nominations aren't handed out to whom we would like, it will draw people to our corner of the web. It's been pointed out to me that drama doesn't reflect well on our medium. I say it just needs to be harnessed properly.

Some links to comics that I thought deserved nominations:
http://bohemiandrive.com/comics/npwil/episodes
http://haru-sari.com/
http://manga.clone-army.org/
http://wapsisquare.com/
http://www.platinumgrit.com/index.htm

So much talent out there.


Fabricari - Sexy Robots and Violent Cyberpunk Comics

Steve "Fabricari" Harrison

Eisner controversy

glych's picture

Quotes from B. Clay Moore (Hawaiian Dick, The Leading Man) from a comic board I frequent:

"I think it's laughable that Steven Griffin was nominated again for best colorist, considering we had one issue come out last year. It's his third nomination for the book. Well, his third Eisner nomination. He was also nominated for Russ Manning Most Promising Newcomer Award, which is given at the Eisners."

"I suppose the fact that the book is a four issue mini, all of which were solicited for 2004, with two issues coming out in 2004 (from which he earned his second Eisner nomination), one issue making it out in 2005 (another Eisner nom), and the fourth issue yet to appear, is hard for me to stomach.

He may be the first guy in history to get three Eisner nominations in three years from one four issue mini-series."

Just thought I'd add to the conversation.

-glych

---

Panel2Panel.com

Awards are dumb.

Tyler Martin's picture

Awards are dumb.

They serve no greater good. They add nothing to the industry. They are a horrible thing often headed up by people that are real peices of work, people that want to be the award gods. They are a false positive aspect of society.

Now a contest/competition, that brings rules, form and challenge to the table. Awards... just a self-serving steaming pile of poopy.

not at all

The William G's picture

One of the reasons Hollywood tends to place their Oscar material so close to the awards themselves is not just so the picture can be fresh in the voter's minds, but also because the picture is likely to still be in theaters at the time and they almost always receive a new surge of business due to the nomination/ win.

And soon to be released oscar-winning DVDs sell well.

And Oscar winners can demand higher salaries and chose their projects more carefully due to their newfound rep/ influence.

So they do serve a greater good and they do add to the industry in a very practical manner.

Obviously webcomics aint movies, but awards and "best of" lists are just large scale recommendations, and nothing more.

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The William G - Romantic Drama, Post-Apocalyptic Monsters, and More Comic Experimentation


All the attention on one

Tyler Martin's picture

All the attention on one thing is the very thing that is screwed up about it.

?

The William G's picture

Someone with something to "sell" shouldnt seek attention?

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The William G - Romantic Drama, Post-Apocalyptic Monsters, and More Comic Experimentation